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HindustanTimes Fri,19 Sep 2014

Patna police's laxity allowed Ranjit to thrive

Ramashankar, PTI  Patna, November 26, 2003
First Published: 19:54 IST(26/11/2003) | Last Updated: 19:54 IST(26/11/2003)

Had the Patna police properly investigated the loot of question papers of the All India Medical Entrance Examinations, conducted by the Central Board of School Examination three years ago, the nationwide admission racket might have been unearthed in 2000.

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According to a complaint lodged with the Sultanganj police station, some miscreants had looted the question papers from the vehicle of the then principal of Government Marwari School in Patna City, while he was on way to the examination centre after collecting the question papers from a bank in Patna on May 17, 2000.

The miscreants had reportedly stopped principal Yadunandan Singh's vehicle near Kanti Factory More at around 8.45 am, gone to a nearby shop and got the question papers photocopied. Surprisingly, the original question papers were then returned to the principal, who reached the school just before the commencement of the examination.

The then district magistrate of Patna had taken a serious note of the incident. He sought a detailed report from the then Patna sub-divisional officer (SDO), AM Shafina. Later, the principal was suspended.

According to the police, the name of Dr Ranjit Singh, the CAT papers leak mastermind, had figured during the investigation in the question loot case. The case was, however, hushed up after intervention of a high-profile police officer, who was then serving as officer in-charge in one of the police stations in Patna.

The Patna police had come to know about Ranjit's involvement in the question leak racket about four years back, following the arrest of four students of the Nalanda Medical College (NMC). The students were arrested from their hostel following the directive of the then city superintendent of police, MS Bhatia, who was tipped off about the admission racket in Patna.

The police, however, did not take action against Ranjit due to his proximity to some police officers and politicians.


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