RSS trying to destabilise Kerala govt through violent means: Sitaram Yechury | india-news | Hindustan Times
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RSS trying to destabilise Kerala govt through violent means: Sitaram Yechury

Yechury clarified his party’s stand on the Ayodhya dispute that it was not in favour of an out-of-court settlement.

india Updated: Mar 24, 2017 21:18 IST
HT Correspondent 
RSS

CPI(M) general secretary Sitaram Yechury.(PTI Photo)

CPI(M) general secretary Sitaram Yechury on Friday said the Rashtriya Swayam Sewak Sangh (RSS) was planning to destabilise the Kerala government by taking out countrywide misinformation campaign.

The saffron brigade is desperately trying to expand its base in the southern state through violent means and the CPI(M) would give a befitting reply through democratic process, Yechury told reporters in Thiruvananthapuram.

“It is using all its means to portray the CPI(M)-led government in bad light. But people of Kerala will realise its designs,” Yechury said, criticising the RSS agitation plan against Kerala chief minister Pinarayi Vijayan.

The RSS has announced to stage protest rallies when the chief minister attends functions outside the state. About RSS resolution in Coimbatore about the alleged attack on RSS cadres by CPI(M) activists, he said “it was a clear case of pot calling the kettle black.”

The CPI(M) general secretary also criticised the Uttar Pradesh government’s crackdown on meat outlets, “targeting members of the minority community”.

“It is really shocking that in the name of cow protection, vigilante groups of RSS were vandalising and terrorising the minority community,” he said.

Yechury also clarified his party’s stand on the Ayodhya dispute that it was not in favour of an out-of-court settlement.

“The Supreme Court cannot absolve itself of its responsibility of adjudicating the matter of land dispute. It is a matter of law and not a political settlement,” he said, criticising the Congress for what he called its continued vacillation on the issue.