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HindustanTimes Wed,01 Oct 2014

Sanaullah- a terrorist who loved flowers and kites

Tarun Upadhyay , Hindustan Times  Jammu, May 09, 2013
First Published: 23:07 IST(9/5/2013) | Last Updated: 09:30 IST(10/5/2013)

Pakistani prisoner Sanaullah Ranjay was not the typical gun-wielding terrorist. He was fond of gardening, flying kites and playing bagpipes. The man who loved flowers was brainwashed to pick up the gun.

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A resident of Daluwali village in Pakistan's Sialkot district, which is about 30km from Jammu city, Sanaullah got associated with the Hizbul Mujahideen terrorist outfit in the early 1990s, the heyday of terrorism in Jammu and Kashmir.

"Unlike hardcore convicts, he repented his actions. He was always ready to accept jail duties, especially gardening, and we obliged due to his good conduct. He was an artist at heart," said Rajni Sehgal, former superintendent, Kot Bhalwal jail, who was suspended over the attack on Sanaullah.

He was made the custodian and guardian of the block in whose barracks was lodged Vinod Singh Bisht - the Indian prisoner who fatally attacked Sanaullah on May 3.

Sehgal said Sanaullah and Bisht enjoyed each other's company and no untoward incident had happened between them earlier. A day before he was attacked, Sanaullah sang and danced with visiting law college students.

Sanaullah was involved in a bomb blast in Satwari chowk area of Jammu on July 16, 1994, which claimed four lives. On November 20, 1994, he carried out a bomb blast at Nagorta, on the outskirts of Jammu, which left 10 people dead. He was arrested that year and was lodged in several jails of the state before being sent to Kot Bhalwal jail in 1999.

His hopes of escaping along with dreaded terrorist Azhar Masood were dashed when the jail authorities detected a tunnel in 1999. Masood was released later that year in exchange for passengers of the hijacked Indian Airlines plane.




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