Day after doctor’s death in Shimla, IGMC on swine flu alert | india-news | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Jul 26, 2017-Wednesday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Day after doctor’s death in Shimla, IGMC on swine flu alert

The hospital treated 14 positive cases this year of which two died. Thirty-one swine flu cases were reported in the state this year.

india Updated: Jul 03, 2017 18:16 IST
HT Correspondent
(HT Representative Image)

A day after Dr RG Sood, 62, the head of the radiology department at the Indira Gandhi Medical College and Hospital (IGMC), died of swine flu, the hospital put its staff on alert and implemented preventive measures.

Senior medical superintendent Dr Ramesh Chand said though there is no patient admitted to IGMC for swine flu treatment, the hospital is geared up to fight the contagious respiratory disease. The hospital treated 14 positive cases this year of which two died. Thirty-one swine flu cases were reported in the state this year.

“If you have cold and fever for over four days, see a doctor. Life can be saved if swine flu is treated in its earlier stages. The staff has been sensitised to wear masks and gloves,” he said.

Dr Sood, who headed the radiology department for six years, was admitted to IGMC two weeks ago. Sources said he was treated for heart trouble but later the symptoms and reports suggested swine flu. “For 11 days, he had high fever. Despite all efforts, the lung infection was increasing,” Dr Chand said.

Another doctor, requesting anonymity, said: “It was too late when the treatment for swine flu started.”

Sood was referred to the Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) when he died near Solan on the way to Chandigarh.

The IGMC is the state’s 50-year-old premier hospital with a daily footfall of 3,000-4,000 patients. It has 800 beds and is full to capacity. Besides outdoor and indoor patients, IGMC has more than 1,300 employees, including 250 senior doctors, 100 junior doctors, 400 nurses, and 100 paramedical staff.

ECMO is a technique to provide breathing and heart support used for critically ill infants but adults may also be treated in case of serious heart or lung problems under certain conditions.