Tripura: Tribal mother takes back child 22 days after ‘selling’ him for Rs 200 | india-news | Hindustan Times
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Tripura: Tribal mother takes back child 22 days after ‘selling’ him for Rs 200

The mother denied selling her son and said poverty forced her to give him away. She also said her second husband did not want the kid as the boy was from her first husband.

india Updated: May 05, 2017 20:03 IST
Priyanka Deb Barman
A tribal mother in Tripura had allegedly sold off her child to an auto-rickshaw driver for Rs 200 on April 13.
A tribal mother in Tripura had allegedly sold off her child to an auto-rickshaw driver for Rs 200 on April 13.(Representative image)

A mother in a tribal Tripura village took back her two-year-old boy on Friday, 22 days after allegedly selling him because of poverty.

Members of Child Line, administrative and police officials of Dhalai district facilitated the return of the child to his mother in Ramkumarpara area of Ultacherra, an autonomous district council (ADC) village about 112 km from state capital Agartala.

Meanwhile, the state played down the matter saying that no such incident took place and it is just a propaganda to defame the Communist government.

The Social Welfare and Social Education Minister Bijita Nath alleged that it is just a scandal.

Neighbours alleged Ruinabati Reang had sold off her child to one Dhanshai Reang for Rs 200 on April 13. Dhanshai, an auto-rickshaw driver, is a resident of Machhkumbhir area of Lakhipur ADC village nearby.

Ruinabati denied selling her son and said poverty forced her to give him away. She also said her second husband did not want the child as the boy was from her first husband.

“We got the information two days ago. We talked to the boy’s mother as well as Dhanshai, who denied buying the child but said the boy was given to him for a better future. We finally handed the baby to the mother after prolonged conversation,” Mrinalini Rakshit, a member of Child Line told HT.

Officials said Ruinabati’s family, jhum or slash-and-burn farmers, does not enjoy any allowance from the government because of lack of documents. The district officials, however, assured her help soon.

Dhanshai, on the other hand, is better off and owns a farmland. He has four daughters of his own and said he agreed to bear the responsibility of Ruinabati’s son out of pity for their poverty.

A similar incident was reported earlier from Rangia Tilla, a remote village in Khowai district. In that case, a tribal woman had sold her newborn son to a childless couple to meet the medical expenses of her ailing husband.

Two such incidents were also reported from Khowai and Dhalai districts in July and September last year.

(with agency inputs)