21 dead, 36 injured in China mine blast | india | Hindustan Times
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21 dead, 36 injured in China mine blast

india Updated: Jun 28, 2006 15:57 IST

At least 21 miners were killed and 36 injured after a gas explosion ripped through a coal mine Wednesday in northeastern China, state press said.

The accident occurred at the Wulong coal mine in Liaoning province's Fuxin city at 9:00 am (0100 GMT), Xinhua news agency reported, citing the provincial coal mine safety bureau.

Twenty-one miners were killed, five remain missing and 36 were injured, the report said.

Local officials at the mine and the Fuxin mine safety bureau refused to comment on the accident when contacted by the agency.

The state-owned Fuxin Mining Group is the operator of the mine, it said.

In one of the worst mining disasters in recent Chinese history, 214 miners were killed in February last year in a gas explosion at the Sujiawan colliery, which also belongs to the Fuxin Mining Group in Fuxin city.

China's booming economy and increasing appetite for energy has been seen as a catalyst for a spate of mine accidents in recent years as mines ignore safety as they scramble to cash in on rising fuel prices.

The nation's coal industry is one of the most dangerous in the world, with nearly 6,000 workers killed in accidents last year, according to government figures.

Independent labour groups put the death toll at 20,000 miners annually as mine operators cover up accidents to avoid costly mine shut downs and fines.

Twenty-one miners were killed, five remain missing and 36 were injured, the report said.

Local officials at the mine and the Fuxin mine safety bureau refused to comment on the accident when contacted by AFP.

The state-owned Fuxin Mining Group is the operator of the mine, it said.

In one of the worst mining disasters in recent Chinese history, 214 miners were killed in February last year in a gas explosion at the Sujiawan colliery, which also belongs to the Fuxin Mining Group in Fuxin city.

China's booming economy and increasing appetite for energy has been seen as a catalyst for a spate of mine accidents in recent years as mines ignore safety as they scramble to cash in on rising fuel prices.

The nation's coal industry is one of the most dangerous in the world, with nearly 6,000 workers killed in accidents last year, according to government figures.

Independent labor groups put the death toll at 20,000 miners annually as mine operators cover up accidents to avoid costly mine shut downs and fines.

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