25,000 medical college hopefuls in limbo | india | Hindustan Times
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25,000 medical college hopefuls in limbo

india Updated: Aug 05, 2007 02:54 IST
Snehal Rebello
Snehal Rebello
Hindustan Times
Highlight Story

The fate of over 25,000 medical college aspirants hangs in the balance. While Maharashtra’s 58 government-run medical colleges have already begun the academic year, private colleges, which collectively have 5,845 seats, have not even declared their first admission list.

The colleges were supposed to have released the list 18 days ago, but students will now have to wait till the matter comes up in the Bombay High Court on August 7.

Last year, the court specified that the first merit list should be out by July 18. However, that didn’t happen because of the heavy rain that delayed distribution of forms. Private medical colleges then moved the court, explaining the delay and asking for a rescheduling of the list to July 31. However, this deadline was also missed.

The Association of Managements of Unaided Private Medical and Dental Colleges said on its website that admissions can only begin once this application is disposed of. The association’s competent authority, Dr A.M. Vare, blamed the Pravesh Niyantran Samiti, the admissions watchdog, for the delay.

“The court decision is just a formality. We were ready to declare the list on July 31, but the samiti on July 24 insisted that we wait,” Vare said.

Amitabh Chandra, medical education secretary and member of the samiti, blamed the association, saying: “The association deviated from the court schedule; they should have got the clearances on time.”

Students and parents are losing patience.

“My daughter is very tense; these are anxious moments for us parents,” said a parent on condition of anonymity.
Some parents also believe that the delay was engineered.

“The association wants to restrict the number of admission lists to one as against the stipulated three to make it easier for them to charge a premium for the seats rather than admitting students on merit,” said Parents Association of Medical Students member Rajesh Jain.

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