26/11 trial to open with Girgaum encounter | india | Hindustan Times
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26/11 trial to open with Girgaum encounter

The prosecution wants to open its case against Mohammed Ajmal Amir Kasab, the lone surviving suspect in the November 26 terror attack on the city, and two other accused with the Girgaum Chowpatty encounter. HT Correspondent reports.

india Updated: May 08, 2009 01:25 IST
HT Correspondent

The prosecution wants to open its case against Mohammed Ajmal Amir Kasab, the lone surviving suspect in the November 26 terror attack on the city, and two other accused with the Girgaum Chowpatty encounter.

Recording of evidence in the terrorism case is expected to begin on Monday.

In the Chowpatty encounter Ismail Khan, the man partnering Kasab, was gunned down.

Special public prosecutor Ujjwal Nikam on Thursday told the special court trying the case he wanted to open with the Girgaum Chowpatty encounter and the murder of Amarsingh Solanki of the hijacked fishing trawler MV Kuber.

Nikam submitted a list of 83 documents related to the encounter and Solanki’s murder on which he wanted to rely to prove the prosecution’s case, primarily against the Pakistani Kasab.

Nikam told Special Judge ML Tahiliyani that Solanki’s murder had come to light only after Kasab’s post-midnight arrest following the encounter.

Nikam said Solanki’s body was hidden inside the engine room of the Kuber and was recovered at Kasab’s instance in the presence of three panch witnesses.

The three panch and a few others are likely to be the first group of prosecution witnesses.

Nikam told the court the witnesses other than the panch included those who had seen the Girgaum Chowpatty encounter and also identified Kasab during the test identification parade.

The special prosecutor said he would submit a list of these witnesses on Friday so that summons could be issued.

Defence counsel Abbas Kazmi sought the permission of the court to visit various spots where it was claimed the different incidents took place, including Kuber.

He added that he was seeking specific permission as he might accidentally talk to prosecution witnesses about the spots and it should not be taken as an attempt on his part to tamper with evidence.

Judge Tahiliyani rejected his plea, saying he was free to visit the spots and did not need the permission of the court.

The judge added that spot visits would be taken up by the court only if necessary and the lawyers concerned would be invited for such visits.