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A bit difficult to swallow

It’s agonising to read about the dietary habits of the captured terrorist. We want to know instead who was responsible for the attacks and why there has been a delay in bringing them to justice.

india Updated: Dec 21, 2008 22:35 IST

A bit difficult to swallow

It’s agonising to read about the dietary habits of the captured terrorist. We want to know instead who was responsible for the attacks and why there has been a delay in bringing them to justice. We want to know about the failure of the Indian State in preventing 26/11, despite intelligence inputs, and what is being done to prevent another attack. The media must honour the fact that this lone survivor is still a major threat to India, and that the State needs to deal with him as such, maintaining utmost confidentiality, and eschew such frivolous reporting.

Jyoti Bhattacharjee, via email

No badges for patriotism

Apropos of Pradeep Magazine’s article Stitched together (Dec 17), Muslims are wearing black bands, organising anti-terror rallies, issuing fatwas against terrorism to express solidarity with the victims of terrorism, and voicing their opposition to its perpetrators. It’s indeed sad that we have to prove our innocence for a crime committed by some cowards, and also prove our love for our country. We hate terrorists but also want to convey the message that the entire Muslim community should not be looked upon suspiciously after every attack. We are Indians first.

Moonis Rehman, Delhi

II

Pradeep magazine is right in saying that we are all together in the fight against terror and for justice. The heads of the Muslim community and the Imams of various mosques have already distanced themselves from the so-called jihadis and condemned the gruesome killing of innocent people. They need not repeatedly prove themselves.

G K Arora, Delhi

Careful, you’re on camera

Apropos of Seema Goswami's article Breaking news, not views (December 17), I admire her gumption in capturing the dilemma of thousands of Indian viewers over the television media's coverage of the 26/11 rescue operation. While the media raved against Ramgopal Verma for ‘touring the Taj’, they themsleves were competing to show the innards of the Taj Mahal hotel. It was the how they gave away the hiding place of some of the hostages, who had secretly called up their families. I guess it is time for the media to adopt some self-regulatory measures in times of such crises.

Sangeeta Dutta, Delhi

II

The media has become a soft target and being made to take the fall for the failure of both the government and the intelligence agencies which could have prevented the ghastly attacks in Mumbai. Although, sensationalism might have driven the coverage of the operations, there was nothing wrong in the broadcast. Every citizen has the right to know what is happening in his/her country. In fact, it was the authorities in charge of the operations who themselves revealed the intricacies in the heat of the moment. It is a fact that the media united India in grief, and is at least one pillar of democracy that can be banked upon.

Ashwani Sharma, Ghaziabad

It’s time to deliver

The UPA, and especially Home Minister P. Chidambaram, must realise the fact that old and new laws alike need effective implementation and efficient monitoring. The government must also acknowledge that the time has come to shift from vote bank politics to peoples' safety and national security, since the public is no longer willing to be fooled by hollow speeches, false promises, loose assurances and new terror laws.

NVSN Murthy, Gandhinagar