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A day too for thorns on Valentine's roses

V-Day is not just the D-day for lovers. It gives others a chance to celebrate too. Like the security forces in J&K and the moral police forces elsewhere in the country. HT reports.

india Updated: Feb 13, 2012 23:56 IST
HT Correspondents

V-Day is not just the D-day for lovers. It gives others a chance to celebrate too. Like the security forces in J&K and the moral police forces elsewhere in the country.

Love has not only clipped the wings of militants in J&K - saddling them with a wife and baby - it has also helped security forces to net them.

Cases in point: Lashkar-e-Taiba commanders Abdullah Unni, Qari Assadullah and Fahdullah and Al Badr commander Zahid.

"Often long romantic conversations land militants in our net," said a counter-insurgency officer.

Unni, the consummate survivor, was undone by love in September 2011. His wedding with Tabassum in 2009 gave security forces the much-needed break. On September 8, 2011, as he came to meet his wife and newborn daughter, the man who survived four encounters with the army was killed.

Zahid's romance with Ulfat proved fatal for him too. And Assadullah and Fahdullah landed in police net.

In Tamil Nadu and Karnataka, meanwhile, the moral police - read the Sangh Parivar - have got ready to battle cupid. Their logic - if you are in love, get married, preferably on spot, in a ceremony officiated by them. Armed with mangalsutras, most are itching to hold suh shotgun weddings in public parks and roads.

"We have written to colleges, schools and hotels requesting them not to allow V Day," said Pramod Muthalik, chief convener of Sriram Sene in Bangalore.

Going a step further, the Sangh Parivar forces plan to hold a 'wedding' between a dog and a donkey in Chennai. Public amore, obviously, is more reprehensible than porngate.