Adopt zero tillage to boost wheat yield | india | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Sep 26, 2017-Tuesday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Adopt zero tillage to boost wheat yield

CHANDRA SHEKHAR Azad Agriculture Technology University ( CSA ) Vice-Chancellor Dr VK Suri on Monday said that there was need to adopt ?zero tillage? technique to boost wheat production in the country. Talking to Hindustan Times, he said that this technology would help in saving input and at the same time enhance wheat crops. He said conventionally farmers used to cultivate fields for three to six times before sowing wheat which often delayed leading to escalation of costs.

india Updated: Nov 14, 2006 00:07 IST

CHANDRA SHEKHAR Azad Agriculture Technology University ( CSA ) Vice-Chancellor Dr VK Suri on Monday said that there was need to adopt ‘zero tillage’ technique to boost wheat production in the country.

Talking to Hindustan Times, he said that this technology would help in saving input and at the same time enhance wheat crops. He said conventionally farmers used to cultivate fields for three to six times before sowing wheat which often delayed leading to escalation of costs. “Recent researches has proved that after paddy harvest, wheat can be sown without field preparation with the help of zero tillage drill,” he added.

Besides, if the farmers used hybrid seeds developed by the university, it would ensure additional benefit to them.

He said many short duration, high-yielding and pest-resistant varieties of crops were developed and farmers who used these varieties also registered good crop-production.

He said seed production on parental lines of hybrid of paddy, maize, pearl-millet and sorghum had also been started at the university.

He further said that in order to compete with other countries in the context of World Trade Organisation (WTO) , it became imperative that the cost effective, value added and attractively packed products be developed. This all could be possible if the research was undertaken religiously.

To a question, he said concentrated efforts were being made to promote crop and seed research and use of organic fertilisers. He said chemical-based fertilizers had awfully reduced nutrients in the soil.

Any delay in restoring the lost nutrients in the soil would convert it into barren field.