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Aggression as policy for Pakistan

It is disheartening to hear Pakistani army chief General Parvez Kayani’s statements to media stating that his forces are prepared to meet any eventuality and his men are ready to sacrifice their lives for the country.

india Updated: Dec 24, 2008 22:39 IST

Aggression as policy for Pakistan
It is disheartening to hear Pakistani army chief General Parvez Kayani’s statements to media stating that his forces are prepared to meet any eventuality and his men are ready to sacrifice their lives for the country. I believe that in troubled times like these, the world should condemn and boycott Kayani, and hence Pakistan, for making such insensitive comments. The United Nations and world powers should intervene to avoid any conflict that might arise just because of one nation’s aggressive and unruly behaviour.
Yash Aneja, via email

Seize the moment
I agree with N. Chandra Mohan’s optimistic definition of recession in Dealing with the R-word (December 22). It dwells on how corrective measures should follow the marginal economic slowdown. As recession cools down, the government has enough time to restore positive sentiment in the industry. The rapid decline in crude oil prices and the rupee strengthening vis-a-vis the dollar reduces imports and crude oil prices. This opportunity, if not seized in time by the government, will be gone forever.
Piyush Agarwal, Ghaziabad

No apples for Eve
With reference to the report From bed to worse (December 22), the Indian judiciary should consider the situation more realistically and minutely to amend the lopsided laws favouring women. There are a lot of men suffering at the hands of their wives who take undue advantage of some unreasonable laws. By indulging in adultery, a woman ruins her own and the other man’s family. How can the National Commission for Women be ignorant of such serious issues and go against men? If adulterous women are not punished, the institution of marriage will collapse and there will be mayhem all around.
Pradipta Bhattacharyya, via email

Led by our noses
The report J&K crorepati candidates pay pittance in taxes (December 22) about the ratio between assets possessed and the income tax paid by some of our contesting MLAs is shocking. This establishes that lawmakers are actually the real law-breakers. It seems that all political parties are hand in glove in hoodwinking the tax authorities by keeping their salaries within the tax bracket and earning the rest through illegal means. I hope the government wakes up at least now and rectifies the situation and exposes the violators so that the general public can trust its ‘leaders’.
Hari Madhu, via email

Not a minor-ity problem
With reference to the report Jump in jobs for minorities (December 24), it is both misleading and lopsided as it talks only about the 150 million- odd Muslims in India. Are Muslims the only minority group in India? Other groups that also fall into the minority category face apathy only because they are smaller in number. This goes against the very cause of uplifting the minority sects, the central theme of the article.
Avantika Sharma, New Delhi

Spread the safety net
Now that VIP security is being reconsidered, ordinary people can hope for increased security for themselves. It is disheartening to see that while there are hardly any personnel at crowded places like railway stations and bus terminals, our bureaucrats have innumerable security guards protecting them. This step, hopefully, will instil some confidence in common citizens regarding their safety in the city.
Ranjana Manchanda, via email