Ahead of Delhi assembly polls, AAP, BJP slug it out on radio | india | Hindustan Times
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Ahead of Delhi assembly polls, AAP, BJP slug it out on radio

The political fight between the Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) and the BJP has entered the radio space with both parties targeting each other with jingles on FM ahead of the Delhi assembly elections likely in mid-February.

india Updated: Jan 07, 2015 23:38 IST
AAP-activists-protest-against-the-land-acquisition-bill-ordinance-passed-by-the-central-government-at-Azad-Maidan-in-Mumbai-Kunal-Patil-HT-photo
AAP-activists-protest-against-the-land-acquisition-bill-ordinance-passed-by-the-central-government-at-Azad-Maidan-in-Mumbai-Kunal-Patil-HT-photo

The political fight between the Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) and the BJP has entered the radio space with both parties targeting each other with jingles on FM ahead of the Delhi assembly elections likely in mid-February.

Parties prefer such campaigns because they have good reach, even to those who are not very affluent. About 8 million people tune in to eight private and three government-owned stations in Delhi every day.

Parties pay from `300 to `1,500 per second to FM stations.

While most BJP campaigns target Arvind Kejriwal for ‘deserting Delhi’, AAP is focussing on ‘positive campaigns’, trying to showcase its short, 49-day rule as an example of good governance. AAP on Wednesday aired a radio ad to counter a recent BJP campaign.

“BJP has run at least four radio campaigns, personally attacking Kejriwal. They don’t have a blueprint for Delhi. They’re relying on a negative campaign,” said Raghav Chadha of the AAP.

BJP says its campaigns ‘merely depict the overall mood of the people who are angry with Kejriwal for quitting. “AAP’s campaign is not at all positive. The police had to ban one of their jingles that had a woman claiming she was molested, but cops did not help. But the party had no proof,” said Ashish Sood of the BJP.

The BJP recently ran a campaign in which an old woman said she was disappointed because the AAP did not value her vote and pulled the plug on its own government. Supporting the campaign, Sood said, “The party came to contest elections as Aam Aadmi and after coming to power they left the Aam Aadmi in the lurch without even consulting them.”

AAP on Wednesday hit back with a jingle in Kejriwal’s voice. “I want to assure that I did not flee. We fell short of a few seats. We will come back with a full majority to serve you. Trust us, we need your blessings. Don’t stay angry. Thoda Muskura Dijiye!” the AAP chief ministerial candidate is heard saying. “It’s no FM war. We have only acknowledged BJP’s latest attack. But we have responded with extreme positivity. Kejriwal has chosen to respond to the woman,” Chadha said.

Other AAP jingles have taken credit for dissolution of the Delhi assembly. They have also featured “students” talking about the problems they faced in pursuing education and pinning their hope on Kejriwal. Following PM Narendra Modi’s ‘mann ki baat’ address, Kejriwal also took to radio to interact with Delhiites last month.