All good intentions down the drain | india | Hindustan Times
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All good intentions down the drain

india Updated: Mar 06, 2009 02:49 IST

With reference to the editorial Nothing left to tap into (Our Take, March 2), it is unfortunate that man is digging up his own grave by misusing water and polluting water resources. Water is the only natural resource which has the ability to renew itself. But we neither consider about using it judiciously, nor renewing it. We must make efforts to stop polluting water bodies, revive groundwater levels and harvest rainwater. With global warming becoming an ominous reality, man needs to pay serious and immediate attention to ensure his survival.

Janaki Narayanan, via email

Home Minister pitched it right

Vir Sanghvi in Pull out all the stumps (March 5), has rightly pointed out that it is absurd to hold IPL matches at the same time as the general elections for it may pose a grave security threat to our nation. The Home Ministry has already received intelligence inputs indicating that the terrorists may disrupt these elections. It would be a big folly to hold T20 matches during that sensitive period. Even a small disruption during general elections would be enough to jeopardise our democracy and allow external forces to take advantage of our weakness. This shouldn’t be allowed to happen in the name of our love for the name of cricket.

Raj Sharma, Indore

II

Vir Sanghvi has rightly pulled up the IPL organisers for not heeding the Home Minister’s advice to hold matches after the general elections. Keeping in mind that our porous borders make for easy entry for terrorists, a large security threat looms over both — elections and the cricket series. And, God forbid, if anything goes wrong with either, who will take the responsibility?

JM Manchanda, Delhi

Give the Army its due

Abhinav Kumar’s views in Snipers stay away (March 3), are illogical. It is an attempt to sidetrack real issues. It reflects the authoritarian feelings of an IPS officer who thinks that since the number of Army personnel is more than that of their civil servants, they enjoy more benefits. The writer seems clueless about the risks that a soldier and his family face. Ever since Independence, the brave Indian soldiers have proved to be the ultimate saviours of our country under all circumstances. So, I would suggest the writer should take into consideration all aspects before arriving at any conclusion.

Rabindra Sharma, Delhi

II

Abhinav Kumar has prevaricated over the circumstances under which the Indian Army is working today, and has focused on trivial issues from the past. It seems he forgot that the Army is summoned each time civil servants fail to perform their duties. Not only does the Army protect our borders from enemies, but it also tackles internal conflicts as and when situations demand. It has never shuddered from its responsibilities and yet it remains subservient to civil servants.

Abhinav Datta, via email

Partners in crime

The attack on the Sri Lankan cricketers confirms that Pakistan is breeding terrorists and the government is unable to do anything about it. The extremists expose the government’s weaknesses and exploit them to the fullest. By calling itself a victim of terrorism, the Pakistani government is trying to make a fool of others. Everybody knows that terrorism in Pakistan is State-sponsored and thrives on political laxity. By attacking the Sri Lankan cricketers, the extremists have again raised the issue of officially labelling Pakistan as a failed State.

Prakash F Madhwani, Bangalore

Bounds of matrimony

Apropos of Preeti Singh’s article Not sweet to cheat (March 5), I agree with the writer’s views and believe that they should be an eye-opener for everyone. Marriage is a bonding of two hearts and cheating on your partner is a grave offence.

Devendra, via email