Amar’s detractors see better days ahead | india | Hindustan Times
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Amar’s detractors see better days ahead

Samajwadi Party leader Janeshwar Mishra is a relieved person today. He was petroleum minister in 1997 in the I.K. Gujral government when Amar Singh was a minor figure in the party.

india Updated: Jan 06, 2010 23:02 IST
M Hasan

Samajwadi Party leader Janeshwar Mishra is a relieved person today.

He was petroleum minister in 1997 in the I.K. Gujral government when Amar Singh was a minor figure in the party.

Subsequently he saw Singh’s star rise, which meant his growing marginalisation. Similar has been the experience of many others.

Though the Samajwadi Party (SP) has received a jolt because of Amar Singh’s resignation from the posts of general secretary, official spokesman and the parliamentary board, this is good news for leaders who did not get along with him.

For Singh’s detractors, it could mean freedom from “continued humiliation”, as a leader of eastern Uttar Pradesh put it.

“(The resignation) was in the making for a long time,” said a senior leader.

There was a strong feeling in the party that Singh’s resignation would not affect the SP. But none of the leaders HT contacted spoke on record.

However, the detractors’ jubilation may be short-lived as the party’s national executive committee could persuade him to stay.

The list of Singh’s detractors is long. While Beni Prasad Verma, Raj Babbar (both Congress MPs), Mohammed Azam Khan, Salim Sherwani and Shafiqur Rahman Barq raised a banner of revolt and left the party, others laid low.

Apart from Mishra, Ramgopal Yadav (party President Mulayam Singh Yadav’s brother), Mohan Singh and Reoti Raman Singh were not getting along with him.

Beni Prasad Verma, once a close confidant of Yadav, called the resignation “blackmailing tactics and a drama”.

Verma said if Amar Singh had been sincere about the issue, he would surrender his Rajya Sabha membership.

Amar Singh and Azam Khan washed their dirty linen in public at the time of the 2009 Lok Sabha elections, leading to the latter’s expulsion from the party. Raj Babbar revolted against the “dalal” (middleman) culture in the party in 2005.

Mulayam and Amar Singh came together in 1996. While Singh wanted a strong base in UP, Yadav found an English-speaking interlocutor who could present the party in the corridors of powers in Delhi and also raise funds.