Ambani case: Cops call Borge’s death an accident | india | Hindustan Times
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Ambani case: Cops call Borge’s death an accident

india Updated: May 18, 2009 02:42 IST
Debasish Panigrahi
Debasish Panigrahi
Hindustan Times
Highlight Story

The death of Air Work’s employee Bharat Borge (45) was an accident, claimed the Railway police on Sunday.

Borge was the first person who detected and reported the pebbles in industrialist Anil Dhirubhai Ambani’s chopper.

After 19 days of investigation, the Railway police have concluded that Borge’s death was an accident and not suicide as suspected.

The police came to the conclusion after they got Borge’s statement from the Crime Branch. The statement did not say anything on any probable suicide motive.

“We have not found any reason to call it a suicide. It was an accident,” said Prakash Sawant, assistant commissioner of police, Government Railway Police.

He added that they had almost wrapped up the investigation and would file the chargesheet in two weeks.

“He had never told about his decision (to commit suicide) before his death,” said Sawant. “He told his sister before leaving home that he would be going to his village (in Satara) on May 7.”

‘Let me get rid of the police hassles, then I will go to the village,’ Sawant quoted Borge’s conversation with his sister on April 29, the day he was found dead on the tracks near Vile Parle station. A hand-written note found on him raised doubts that he might have committed suicide.

Sawant said: “Probably he was planning to hand over the note to the police who were investigating the case.”

Sawant said Borge was a shy person. “He was scared of the police and the workers’ union. He was apprehensive that the helpers would be arrested but the thought of the police (investigation) was worrying him,” Sawant said.

Probably he was carrying the note for the police as it would save him from explaining things to them, added Sawant.

He said the statement of the motorman of the train that allegedly ran over him, also failed to pinpoint any suicide motive. “As per the motorman’s statement, Borge was crossing the tracks quite oblivious to the approaching train. Perhaps he was perplexed to see the train from a close distance and out of shock, he failed to react and just squatted on the tracks,” Sawant said.

“Borge’s statement contains nothing to raise a suspicion,” Sawant added.