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An unkind cut for the masses

india Updated: Feb 26, 2009 22:31 IST
Hindustan Times
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Apropos of the report The great election gamble (February 25), the excise cut and deduction in the service tax by the UPA government are not what a common man would be benefited by in the present times. The reason is simple: industry won’t pass on the benefits to the consumers in order to earn profits. Due to high costs of production and recession, our industrial sector is in a bad shape. Take the case of the real estate sector. Despite the economic slump, have the builders reduced property prices? No. The same holds true for other sectors too. The government should have, instead, reduced the income tax which would have helped the masses directly.

Siddharth Shankar, via email

Don’t stop the press

Rajdeep Sardesai correctly acknowledges the Pakistani media’s bravery in Live from Pakistan (Beyond the Byte, February 20). I feel that there is a strong need for yellow journalism in the Indian subcontinent. The press performed their real duties well by spreading awareness on nationalism during the British Raj. The media had exhibited their true determination and fearlessness then and continue to do so ever since. Pakistani mediapersons are showing their courage by exposing the government’s wrongdoing and the true nature of the Taliban. Their efforts deserve appreciation.

Saumya Brata Panda, via email

Take the lead, make a change

Apropos of Suhel Seth’s article Brand aid for India (February 25), I believe that one movie is far too little to change the way a nation thinks. But it is enough to remove the veil of ignorance from people’s minds. If movies like Rang de Basanti can encourage people to adopt peaceful means of protest and if Taare Zameen Par can highlight sensitive issues like dyslexia and the drawbacks in our education system, then Slumdog too can help us change our outlook towards issues like communal hatred, child trafficking and poverty and work towards eliminating them.

Harish Benjwal, Delhi

LTTE’s opportunistic truce call

With reference to the editorial The time for a truce is over (Our Take, February 24), on what basis is the LTTE proposing a truce when it is not ready to lay down arms? At a time when the Sri Lankan army is approaching the Tigers’ last bastion with an intention to end the 26-year-old problem, a call for a truce only signifies the Tamils Tigers’ incapability to retaliate. If they are really fighting for the Tamil cause, then the LTTE should surrender and protect the remaining Tamil civilians in the country.

Tarlok Singh, via email

Cocktail of malice and tech

Apropos of the report Noida MMS case: Girl lodges FIR against friend (February 25), Noida has always been in the news for all wrong reasons. And now, it is the MMS scandal that has exposed how the misuse of technology, coupled with malicious intent, can destroy an innocent life. It should teach a lesson to every girl who falls prey to selfish boys and ends up humiliating her family name.

Sakshi Chawla, via email

Is the message still unclear?

Indians are very proud that A R Rahman has won two Oscars. Story-wise Salaam Bombay and Slumdog Millionaire are very similar, the only difference being the climax. If an Englishman shows the worst of India, it wins awards, while the story of an ordinary villager by an Indian is considered unworthy of an award. It’s a pity that while the whole world mocks Indian slums, we continue to celebrate them. Has the worst of America ever been similarly portrayed or are we so naïve as to believe that poverty is an exclusively Indian phenomenon?

Kamini Sharma, Vienna

II

While our political bigwigs are lauding the success of Slumdog at the Oscars, nobody is thinking about the real meaning of this movie. No politician has as yet stated that s/he will try to eradicate forced beggary. It’s high time we did something for the betterment of slum children.

Shweta Jain, Delhi

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