Anti-quota lobby protests outside SC | india | Hindustan Times
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Anti-quota lobby protests outside SC

india Updated: Apr 25, 2008 23:43 IST
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Protesting against the implementation of OBC quota in higher educational institution, students under the banner of Youth for Equality on Friday staged a demonstration inside the Supreme Court premises.

Though the students surprised the security personnel, they were rounded off before they could enter the court complex. Over 250 students from AIIMS, Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU), Delhi University, IIT-Delhi and government- run medical colleges gathered at the SC lawns around 11 am.

As a result of the ensuing clash, 93 students were detained at Tilak Marg police station. Some students who were injured were taken to Dr Ram Manohar Lohia Hospital. “We were peacefully protesting in the lawns with posters when the police started pulling us out. Many of us have got injuries,” said Dr Kumar Harsh, president, Resident Doctors' Association, AIIMS.

The students have promised a fitting reply. “What they have done was uncalled for. We will have a mega general body meeting tomorrow and then we will stage a new event. Every time they behave like this, we will come back with a fitting reply,” said Dr Kaushal Kant Mishra, RDA General Secretary.

As of now, medical students maintain that staying away from work is not being considered. “That will be our last resort. We have sent letters to the Prime Minister and the HRD Minister the day before. But no one has replied as yet. The government is violating Supreme Court norms that bar reservation at the post graduate level by directing the IIMs to implement it,” added Dr Kaushal

According to the students, the government is trying to circumvent the Supreme Court ruling by planning to extend quota benefit to post graduate courses. The SC on April 10 upheld the controversial law providing 27 per cent quota for OBCs in IITs, IIMs and other central educational institutions but excluded the “creamy layer” from its ambit.