Anti-secular, anti-national policy | india | Hindustan Times
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Anti-secular, anti-national policy

It is anti-national because it retards the country's growth, preventing it from reaching its full potential and simultaneously frustrating the gifted youth due to lack of opportunity. How can our country be expected to compete with global giants such as the US, Europe and China, with international politics slowing us down all the time, if we keep retarding ourselves in this manner?

india Updated: Apr 20, 2006 17:42 IST

I would like to say that reservation is principally anti-secular and anti-national. Whereas on one hand constitutionally we say that there is no separation between citizens of various caste or religion or creed in our "secular" country, we make constitutional amendments to enforce reservations in professional institutions and, according to a new proposal, even in private jobs that constitutionally discriminate between the candidates on the basis of their birth and not their capabilities.

It is anti-national because it retards the country's growth, preventing it from reaching its full potential and simultaneously frustrating the gifted youth due to lack of opportunity. How can our country be expected to compete with global giants such as the US, Europe and China, with international politics slowing us down all the time, if we keep retarding ourselves in this manner?

The new found international recognition of India can be easily lost and all the hard work put in to achieve this can be rendered useless simply due to an attempt to influence the country's growth engines adversely. It is not just playing vote bank politics but simply taking the easy way out by providing a short-term solution to a problem that needs better planning and sincere implementation.

Instead of establishing and funding new esteemed IITs and IIMs the government finds it more convenient to make further reservations in them. The recent proposal of the IIMs was rejected on the very grounds that new institutes should be established domestically to satisfy Indian demand and then only should they be allowed to be established abroad.

And the government is now contradicting its own stand on the issue by furthering reservation thereby increasing competition and reducing opportunity. With poor quality of intake, the prestige of the IIMs and the IITs will be easily tarnished and they would lose their stature of being providers of world-class managers and engineers respectively.

The reservations in private sector jobs would also compromise on finished job quality and in order to make up for that, Indian private sector giants could possibly migrate to other global destinations for more conducive environments and governments. A country with a billion people cannot afford such a huge mismanagement of human resources especially when the economy is on a boom and the world observing its growth closely.

The US is termed as the land of opportunity. We seem to be heading in the opposite direction.