Asian juggernaut | The rise of China, India and Japan | india | Hindustan Times
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Asian juggernaut | The rise of China, India and Japan

india Updated: Oct 13, 2006 17:32 IST

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A resurgent Asia is now emerging as the global pivot. With the world's fastest- growing markets, fastest-rising military expenditures and most-serious hotspots.

Asia holds the key to the future global order.

Underpinning its renaissance, Asia has become the world's economic locomotive, even as its arts, fashion and cuisine regain international recognition.

Yet, with interstate competition sharpening, Asia faces complex security, energy and developmental challenges in an era of globalisation, including how to move beyond historical legacies and tap its dynamism for greater prosperity and well-being.

The Author

Brahma Chellaney is one of India's leading strategic thinkers and analysts. He is also well-known television commentator on international affairs. Professor Chellaney has published research papers in International Security, Orbis, Survival, Washington quarterly, Security Studies, Terrorism and other journals. In 1985, he won a Citation for Excellence from the Overseas Press Club (OPC), New York. He holds a PhD in arms control. Presently, he is professor of strategic studies at the Centre for Policy Research, an independent think-tank in New Delhi, and a member of the Policy Advisory Group headed by the foreign minister of India. A specialist on international-security issues, Professor Chellaney has held appointments at the Harvard University, the Brookings Institution, the Johns Hopkins University's School of Advanced International Studies and the Australian university.

The colossal shift in global geopolitics presents new opportunities to Asia and test its ability to assume a bigger role in international relations.

The book examines the ascent of Asia by focusing on its three main powers - China, India and Japan.

A qualitative reordering of power in an Asia characterised by tectonic shifts in challenging strategic stability and affecting equations between these powers.

How the China-Japan, China-India and Japan-India equations evolve in the coming years will have a crucial bearing on Asian and global security.

Constituting a strategic triangle, these powers are Asia's largest economies.

Their interests are getting so intertwined that the pursuit of unilateral solutions by any one of them will disturb the peaceful environment on which their continued economic growth and security depend.

The author analyses the global ramifications of the emerging Chinese colossus.

He also highlights the fact that Japan's quiet, undeclared transition from pacifism to a 'normal' state will help shape the future of Asian and global geopolitics.

Even as it has reinvigorated its military ties with the United States, japan is beginning to rethink its security and international role.

The third major Asian player, India, is coming of age by displaying greater realism in economic and foreign policies and moving towards geopolitical pragmatism.

India now recognises that it can wield international power only by building up its economic and military strength.

A strong China, a strong Japan and a strong India need to find ways to reconcile their interests in Asia so that they can peacefully coexist and prosper.

Given that these powers have not all been strong at the same time before in history, stable political relationships between them are central to Asian security.

The book sets out how all states in Asia could benefit from cooperative approaches in which China, India and Japan take the lead. A resurgent Asia is now emerging as the global pivot. With the world's fastest growing markets, fastest-rising military expenditures and most-serious hotspots.

Asia holds the key to the future global order.

Underpinning its renaissance, Asia has become the world's economic locomotive, even as its arts, fashion and cuisine regain international recognition.

Yet, with interstate competition sharpening, Asia faces complex security, energy and developmental challenges in an era of globalisation, including how to move beyond historical legacies and tap its dynamism for greater prosperity and well-being.

The colossal shift in global geopolitics presents new opportunities to Asia and test its ability to assume a bigger role in international relations.

The book examines the ascent of Asia by focusing on its three main powers - China, India and Japan.

A qualitative reordering of power in an Asia characterised by tectonic shifts in challenging strategic stability and affecting equations between these powers.

How the China-Japan, China-India and Japan-India equations evolve in the coming years will have a crucial bearing on Asian and global security.

Constituting a strategic triangle, these powers are Asia's largest economies.

Their interests are getting so intertwined that the pursuit of unilateral solutions by any one of them will disturb the peaceful environment on which their continued economic growth and security depend.

The author analyses the global ramifications of the emerging Chinese colossus.

He also highlights the fact that Japan's quiet, undeclared transition from pacifism to a 'normal' state will help shape the future of Asian and global geopolitics.

Even as it has reinvigorated its military ties with the United States, japan is beginning to rethink its security and international role.

The third major Asian player, India, is coming of age by displaying greater realism in economic and foreign policies and moving towards geopolitical pragmatism.

India now recognises that it can wield international power only by building up its economic and military strength.

A strong China, a strong Japan and a strong India need to find ways to reconcile their interests in Asia so that they can peacefully coexist and prosper.

Given that these powers have not all been strong at the same time before in history, stable political relationships between them are central to Asian security.

The book sets out how all states in Asia could benefit from cooperative approaches in which China, India and Japan take the lead.

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