Bachchan's all sound and fury over a copyright on his voice | india | Hindustan Times
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Bachchan's all sound and fury over a copyright on his voice

This refers to the editorial The tone and tenor (The Pundit, November 8). It is unfortunate that Amitabh Bachchan plans to copyright his voice so that nobody can imitate it.

india Updated: Nov 10, 2010 22:01 IST

Bachchan's all sound and fury over a copyright on his voice
This refers to the editorial The tone and tenor (The Pundit, November 8). It is unfortunate that Amitabh Bachchan plans to copyright his voice so that nobody can imitate it.

Has he forgotten that had it not been for playback singer Sudesh Bhonsle, who best imitates Bachchan's baritone voice, there wouldn't have been many hit songs, like Jumma Chumma from Hum, which have helped Bachchan rise to the level of a megastar?
P Pradeep, Sagar

II
Bachchan's objection to the use of his voice in a gutka advertisement is justified. It sends out a wrong signal, that the superstar is endorsing a product whose regular consumption can be injurious to health. It's unclear whether or not there is a provision to get a copyright on an individual's voice. But if it's possible, then Bachchan must get it done.
Mahesh Kapasi, via email

In step with Indians
With reference to the editorial All rhyme and rhythm (The Pundit, November 9), the Obamas dancing with children in Mumbai shows that their visit wasn't limited to signing business deals or bolstering diplomatic ties between India and the US.

They had come to experience our rich culture and get to know Indians closely. Our politicians must follow suit and loosen up a little while interacting with people. This will help them connect with the masses and understand their problems better.
Sharda Bhargav, via email

II
Barack Obama's wish for "a reformed UN Security Council that includes India as a permanent member" is good news for India. Pakistan, as expected, reacted swiftly and condemned Obama's proposition.

The US is in a tight spot vis-à-vis its relations with both India and Pakistan, as it can't afford to displease either nation. With his statement, he has ruffled many feathers in Islamabad. It'll be interesting to see how he wins back Pakistan's trust without upsetting New Delhi.
Shafaque Alam, Delhi

Well begun but half done
The Congress shouldn't stop at ousting Maharashtra Chief Minister Ashok Chavan and Indian Olympic Association chief Suresh Kalmadi, it must also recover the taxpayers' hard-earned money that both the guilty had siphoned off (Congress clean-up claims Chavan, November 10).

The party should also ensure that unlike Shivraj Patil, who was expelled after the 26/11 terror attacks and was later made the Punjab governor, neither Kalmadi nor Chavan are given important public positions once the public ire against them cools.
S Anand, Bhopal

Singh proves he is king
By lashing out at Pakistan, telling the world that India is not afraid of the "K-word" and that talks and terror can't go hand-in-hand, Prime Minister Manmohan Singh has silenced all those who think he is meek and lacks authority.

Singh also showed courage by telling the US president that Indians don't steal jobs from Americans and that the outsourcing industry is doing more good than harm for the people of both the US and India.
Hansraj Bhat, via email

It's not raising the bar
The decision of the Bar Council of India (BCI) to introduce a written examination for the enrolment of advocates is unjustified, as it reduces the worth of the existing LLB examination. Moreover, instead of examinations, let market forces decide if a lawyer is qualified enough to survive intense competition.
Sunil Mathur, Allahabad