Bihar school ravaged by naxals, kids protest | india | Hindustan Times
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Bihar school ravaged by naxals, kids protest

More than 500 students of a Muzaffarpur high school that had been ravaged by Maoist violence took to the streets on Tuesday to raise their voice against the red brigade. Ajay Kumar reports.

india Updated: Feb 17, 2011 01:36 IST
Ajay Kumar

More than 500 students of a Muzaffarpur high school that had been ravaged by Maoist violence took to the streets on Tuesday to raise their voice against the red brigade.

They carried anti-Maoist placards and banners in protesting against the blowing up of the government run Dhanraj High School building by the ultras on January 26.

The Maoists had assaulted teachers who pulled down the black flags planted by the reds and unfurled the national flag because it was Republic Day. Principal Pramod Kumar Singh and assistant teacher Virendra Singh are still undergoing treatment in hospital.

Angry at "the attack on their careers", the students, along with their teachers, raised slogans against the outlawed red outfit, Communist Party of India (Maoist).

Politicians, students of other schools, social workers and volunteers from other sectors were present to support the students' agitation. One banner read: "Chhatron ki jindagi se khilwad band karo; bhai hamein sab sath do, chalo hamara school khulwado (stop playing with students' careers; brothers, join us and open our school)."

Student Khushbu Kumari said their agitation would continue till their demands were met. "We are requesting the members of the rebel group not to destroy our lives. Our agitation will continue till our school reopens," she added.

Sub-divisional officer (east) Rajesh Kumar Bharti said he had sought a detailed report from the district education officer. "Efforts are on to resume classes," he said, adding that the school would reopen soon. “While the Maoists claim they are well-wishers of the poor, they were keeping the children of the downtrodden away from basic necessities,” said Suman Kumar, a student.