Bitter pill that can kill | india | Hindustan Times
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Bitter pill that can kill

With reference to the editorial Side effects that could kill (Our Take, January 28), one wonders why we had to wait for a study by a foreign university to expose the horrific reality of the contamination of water bodies by pharmaceutical industries.

india Updated: Jan 30, 2009 12:23 IST

Bitter pill that can kill
With reference to the editorial Side effects that could kill (Our Take, January 28), one wonders why we had to wait for a study by a foreign university to expose the horrific reality of the contamination of water bodies by pharmaceutical industries. The toxic waste has been seeping into groundwater for years now. Yet, neither the government nor the pharma companies bothered to pay any heed to it. It is ironical that while on the one hand the companies make drugs to cure various ailments, they are the ones who spread diseases as well.
RK Malhotra, Delhi

Qualifications? Who cares?
Rajdeep Sardesai in The door’s open, come right in (Beyond the Byte, January 23), has rightly pointed out how many politicians are eyeing the coveted post of the nation’s Prime Minister. It doesn’t matter if they lack even the basic political and leadership qualities. The voters might be left dejected if a person whom they never expected or desired to win occupies the top post. The PM should enjoy the citizens’ support instead of following what the members of his coalition party desire.
SK GUPTA, via email

II
Rajdeep Sardesai is right in saying that leadership skills, political acumen, social experience and mass acceptability are no longer criteria for selecting the candidate for India’s top post. It is almost certain that the upcoming general elections will witness a fractured verdict and post-poll negotiation will play a vital role in determining who becomes our next Prime Minister. The best negotiator will have an edge over others, as a result of which India will again see a rickety coalition government at the Centre.
Mansoor Ilahi, via email

III
Rajdeep Sardesai seems to have overlooked the role of destiny in a person’s life. The Prime Minister’s post is no exception. Also, when chance favours an individual, he automatically becomes capable of fulfilling his responsibilities. Did Deve Gowda or Inder Gujral prove to be bad PMs for the nation? As a matter of fact, Rajdeep himself wanted to become a cricketer but destiny led him to journalism and his capabilities made him successful. Who knows tomorrow his destiny might take him to politics and one day he may go on to become the PM?
Subhash Sharma, via email

A neighbour not worth loving
With reference to Yukteshwar Kumar’s article Crouching dragon (January 28), it is shocking to learn that despite our knowledge of China’s anti-India sentiments, we are keen on befriending our neighbour. There is no doubt that China and Pakistan are allies. If we are unable to assert our opinions and demands like Israel and other nations, then we must at least stop fooling ourselves by proposing the ideology that friendship among India, Pakistan and China will benefit everyone.
Amber Kumar, via email

A squeak instead of a roar
Brahma Chellaney in Incredulous !ndia (January 27) has correctly analysed that we have been bearing the brunt of cross-border terrorism owing to our weak policies. Isn’t it surprising that no nation ever speaks a word against China on the Tibet issue, but everyone wants to share opinions on Kashmir? It is because of our leaders’ submissive attitude and their failure to take a firm stand on any issue.
Om parkash Dhingra, via email

II
The inglorious history of being subjugated for over eight centuries should have taught Indian leaders that the politics they practise can impoverish the nation if timely corrective measures are not taken. They seem to be oblivious of this and act irresolutely, leading to multiple complications. Surprisingly, they display a sense of guilt more than valour and lack leadership qualities, strategic foresight, national security planning etc. India’s reaction to the 26/11-terror attack only confirms these apprehensions. India needs to develop a no-nonsense approach when dealing with its various problems.
JL Ganjoo, Delhi