Board examinations begin today; HOTS cool this year, say students | india | Hindustan Times
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Board examinations begin today; HOTS cool this year, say students

It is that time of the year. Over 14.5 lakh students across 5,223 centres will appear for their Class X and XII exams beginning today. Delhi alone has over four lakh of these. Unlike last year, when the CBSE introduced questions that tested students’ High Order Thinking Skills just a few weeks before the exams, there are no radical changes this time round, reports Ritika Chopra. See graphics

india Updated: Mar 02, 2009 01:21 IST
Ritika Chopra

It is that time of the year. Over 14.5 lakh students across 5,223 centres will appear for their Class X and XII exams beginning today. Delhi alone has over four lakh of these.

Unlike last year, when the CBSE introduced questions that tested students’ High Order Thinking Skills (HOTS) just a few weeks before the exams, there are no radical changes this time round.

Last year, when HOTS caught them by surprise, the number of students scoring a perfect 100 in Maths, Physics, Accountancy and Economics in Class XII dipped. From 1,146 students who scored a 100 in mathematics in 2007, the national figure came down to just 344 in 2008.

Apart from minor changes in the Science and Social Science papers at the secondary level, the pattern of the examination will remain the same as last year.

In Delhi the number of those scoring a cent per cent in Math fell from 234 in 2007 to 105 in 2008.

This year, however, students can’t blame bad grades on HOTS. They’ve had an entire year to practice. Schools are hopeful more students will ace papers, especially mathematics and English than last year.

Last year, private schools such as Springdales (Dhaula Kuan and Pusa Road), Modern School (Vasant Vihar), Laxman Public School and Delhi Public School (Mathura Road) had complained that students who with high marks in other subjects, had to suffer because of comparatively lower English scores.

“CBSE has always had application-based questions. Last year the board chose to highlight it with a new name and that led to panic among students. But now children are more aware and confident,” said Jyoti Bose Principal, Springdales School, Dhaula Kuan.

The CBSE has introduced some special services this year for physically challenged students.

Special educators are available on the phone to resolve their queries and the Board will provide an amanuensis (Latin for a writer to assist a disabled person appearing for an exam) to disabled students, free of cost.