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Book of the week: Healthy Thinking

india Updated: Aug 25, 2006 13:22 IST
Highlight Story

Healthy Thinking
Author:
Tom Mulholland
Publisher: Wisdom Tree
Price: Rs 125

Are there times when you feel lonely, melancholic, and low on self-esteem? Do you ever feel the need to retreat into your cocoon and distance yourself from the rest of humanity? Most of us have been through these phases at one time or the other in our lives.

In this respect, Dr. Tom Mulholland has been no different. His book, Healthy Thinking, which is about a journey of self-analysis, deals with these topics. The book's tagline —how to turn life's lemons into lemonade — and the bright cover are bound to draw your attention.

And the realisation that the author is a doctor will result in certain expectations from the book, even before you start reading it. But unfortunately, Healthy Thinking is neither as interesting as the bright yellow colour, nor does it live up to your expectations.

The first part focuses on the author's journey to healthy thinking and takes up half of the book. For doctors and those in the business profession, this part might prove to be interesting.

But it definitely lacks a universal appeal. The in-depth explanations of the technicalities involved in a situation, medical jargon and the attention to detail given to how a business functions make it difficult for a reader to keep his interest in the book alive.

An option is to safely skip this part, if you don't mind doing so. Thankfully, things do get better once you get through the first half of Healthy Thinking. The other three parts give you an insight into the techniques of healthy thinking, how to use healthy thinking and success behaviours.

These are pretty interesting and keep you hooked up. For instance, in the second part Dr. Mulholland uses the technique of comparative analysis to highlight two different kinds of attitudes, thus making it easier for the reader to decide which of the two options would be a better one in a given situation.

Interesting concepts like Emotional Algebra, and theories like, “Your life can go in 282 million different directions in a day!” make up for the first half. These, among others like, “What has happened in the past is only in your memory and what will happen in the future is only in your imagination. Enjoy where you are now, because it is real,” manage to have the desired effect of making you, the reader, feel good about your life. Read it if you are feeling down and out and the world seems to be one big conspiracy.

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