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Border issue cannot be a barrier to India-China cooperation

This refers to the report Big banking deals on Day 1 (December 16). China’s rapid emergence on the world stage is remarkable, its growth fuelled by huge investments in education, technology and health.

india Updated: Dec 18, 2010 01:08 IST

Border issue cannot be a barrier to India-China cooperation

This refers to the report Big banking deals on Day 1 (December 16). China’s rapid emergence on the world stage is remarkable, its growth fuelled by huge investments in education, technology and health. But the border issue should not come in the way of nurturing tie-ups between the two nations. To resolve the border issue, courage and vision is needed on the part of India and China. Both India and China are Asian giants. The two nations will reach the pinnacles of growth on all fronts with mutual understanding.

P Saravana Durai, Hyderabad

Frozen in the past

Tenzin Tsundue’s letter An open letter to Wen Jiabao from a well-wisher (December 16) regrets the angst of a young Tibetan in exile. Of course, the Chinese repression of the Tibetans is unmatched. The slogan of ‘India Chini bhai bhai’ that echoed once when Zhou En-lai visited India in 1962, is echoing again. But it is likely to be a long wait for the ice to melt in India-China relations and for the Tibetans to breathe easy.

RK Kutty, Bhopal

A poverty of action here

Samar Halarnkar in his article Their growth pangs (Maha Bharat, December 16) is right in stating that because of fast unfolding scams, no one took notice of the deaths due to malnutrition and hunger in the financial capital of our country. It is shocking to learn about these tragic deaths in Mumbai. The state government must tackle this issue immediately to save the nation further embarrassment.

Bal Govind, Noida

The high price of vice

Barkha Dutt in Beyond the anger (Third Eye, December 11) highlights a serious development that may adversely affect our national growth and development. While the 2G spectrum scam should have initiated a politico-economic churning and subsequent cleansing, it has resulted in a sense of chaos and a lack of faith in governance. No one has paid attention to the damage it has caused to the exchequer and the job market. Our political leadership should not allow the real issue to get obscured by the blockade of Parliament.

Ved Guliani, Hisar

II

Dutt is right about the an almost planned inertia on the government’s part to act against people allegedly involved in the 2G spectrum scam. In order to save its face, the government must bring the guilty to book. The sooner the government acts, the faster its image will be restored.

SP Ganapati, via email

Discordant sounds of silence

Namita Bhandare’s article Negotiating the crossroads (Another Day, December 11) rightly states that by refusing to concede to the Opposition demand for a Joint Parliamentary Committee (JPC), the UPA government has confirmed the perception that it has something to hide. It is a myth that Prime Minister Manmohan Singh’s personal reputation for integrity is unimpeachable. In fact, his silence on the corruption issue has done enough harm to the nation. He must accept moral responsibility for any impropriety in his team.

SK Wasan, Noida

II

Bhandare raises a valid point regarding the never-ending rule of corruption. There has been an immense increase in the incidence of corruption over the past few years and the government does not seem to be bothered to control this. The roots of corruption are getting stronger and if corrective measures are not introduced soon, the country will be reduced to a banana republic.

Anindita Ghosh, via email