BSF-BDR talks in Delhi from tomorrow | india | Hindustan Times
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BSF-BDR talks in Delhi from tomorrow

India and Bangladesh will discuss issues related to cross-border terrorist activities and joint patrolling of the frontiers as top officers of border guarding forces of both the countries begin their four-day meeting in New Delhi on Monday.

india Updated: Mar 07, 2010 11:50 IST

India and Bangladesh will discuss issues related to cross-border terrorist activities and joint patrolling of the frontiers as top officers of border guarding forces of both the countries begin their four-day meeting in New Delhi on Monday.

While Border Security Force (BSF) Director General Raman Srivastava will lead the Indian side, Major General Mainul Islam is leading a 19-member team of Bangladesh Rifles (BDR) officials for the 'Border Coordination conference' here.

The talks will focus on preventing cross-border terrorist movement, trafficking of women, children and contraband, joint management of border pillars, fencing within 150 metres of the International border and smuggling among others, a senior BSF officer said.

The last round of talks between the forces' took place in July last year in Dhaka while in April the BDR delegation visited the country after a savage mutiny at the headquarters of the BDR led to the killing of its chief Major General Shakeel Ahmed.

The issue of terrorist camps especially those from the country's Northeast and which operate within the territory of Bangladesh and harbouring of some criminals wanted by India will also be taken up during the meeting.

During the last year's meet in the national capital, India assured Bangladesh that any "recalcitrant elements" of the BDR will not be allowed to enter the country and offered all possible help in restructuring of the paramilitary force.

BSF and BDR are counterparts along the 4,096-kilometre long India-Bangladesh border.

During the July talks at Dhaka both the countries exchanged lists of wanted "criminals and terrorists" believed to be hiding or detained in each other's territories.