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Bungled policies

On the sixth anniversary of the tragic 9/11, the United States must reflect on what Bush has really achieved so far.

india Updated: Sep 12, 2007 00:37 IST

Bungled policies

On the sixth anniversary of the tragic 9/11, the US must reflect on what Bush has really achieved so far. The US should analyse its relationship with the rest of the world and assess whether it was really justified going to war on the pretext that 9/11 was a conspiracy. In fact, the blunders on policy issues, aimed at imposing US hegemony, has damaged the country’s reputation and created more enemies than ever.

K Padmavalli,
Hyderabad

Needless dependence

I endorse Brahma Chellaney’s views in HypE=mc2 (September 10) that nuclear power is not an ideal future source of energy as it contributes to global warming in significant measure. Its generating cost being very high, it will be a burden on consumers. When we have an independent thorium path of energy generation, why should we barter it for dependence on the US and NSG countries for fuel supply? Why should we not bring about a constitutional amendment in decision-making to conclude such treaties.

HL Dhawan
via e-mail

Violent history

Apropos of Ramachandra Guha’s article Our violent streak (September 6), the usual perception is that it was Gandhi’s non-violent movement that forced the British to leave India. When Congress leaders were released from jail in 1945, there was despondency in the country. But two events changed the whole atmosphere. One was the trial of INA leaders and the other was the Naval Mutiny of 1946. The British did not have the same power after World War II, so they released the INA officers who had been condemned to death.

Vidya Sagar,
Delhi

II

It is improper to bracket Subhas Bose with Bhagat Singh or Savarkar. Religious fanatics and Leftists guided by fads cannot be taken seriously. Gandhi, whose non-violent movements turned violent in the long-run, was projected as an apostle of peace by the imperialist forces for their own interest.

Sudip Narayan,
Lucknow

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