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Can Cong talk round DMK?

india Updated: Mar 06, 2011 18:59 IST
HT Correspondent
HT Correspondent
Hindustan Times
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Was the DMK’s resolution to withdraw from the central government and snap its alliance with the Congress in Tamil Nadu a decision taken in angry haste or a fait accompli?

The question assumes importance because the ruling party of Tamil Nadu has left the door open for reconciliation, but wants the Congress to make the first move towards an amicable solution.

DMK sources say the marriage is over unless the Congress becomes "reasonable" in its demand and modifies it into something "just and fair".

"The negotiations have to be fair and practical," said a senior DMK leader, requesting anonymity.

If the Congress does not ask for more than 60 seats, does not insist on particular assembly constituencies, and makes the first move towards a thaw, DMK supremo and Tamil Nadu chief minister M Karunanidhi will be agreeable to review the decision, say DMK sources.

But for now, the DMK is maintaining its central ministers would reach New Delhi on Monday and put in their papers after meeting Prime Minister Manmohan Singh.

There are unconfirmed reports of the arrival of Congress stalwarts union finance minister Pranab Mukherjee and union health minister Ghulam Nabi Azad, who is also in charge of Tamil Nadu affairs for his party, to talk to an upset Karunanidhi and persuade him to revoke his decision.

Mukherjee has a spate of money bills to be passed in Parliament and would like to have the DMK, which has been part of the central government since 2004, on board.

However, officially, the Congress sources here denied any knowledge of this.

From early morning media persons camped outside the Gopalapuram residence of Karunanidhi and made rounds of DMK headquarters for any development that might take place, but had to stay content hearing that the party was awaiting a peace proposal from the Congress.