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Car turns death trap for man

The 27-year-old son of a government engineer was found dead inside a Honda-City car parked inside the garage of the victim’s house in Sanjay Vihar colony of Hapur town of Ghaziabad, police officials said on Thursday, reports Peeyush Khandelwal.

india Updated: May 14, 2010 01:13 IST
Peeyush Khandelwal

The 27-year-old son of a government engineer was found dead inside a Honda-City car parked inside the garage of the victim’s house in Sanjay Vihar colony of Hapur town of Ghaziabad, police officials said on Thursday.

His 24-year-old woman friend was found in an unconscious state inside the same car.

The victim, Ramesh Sharma (name changed) was found dead, while his friend Rita Singh (name changed), a post-graduate student, were found in the car parked inside the victim’s garage late on Wednesday evening, after police launched a search operation for the two.

Police sources said the two were allegedly having an affair and that’s why were found together inside the car.

While Ramesh was married, Rita was not.

According to Superintendent of Police (SP) Capt. M.M. Baig, Rita’s family members approached the Hapur police station and complained that their daughter was missing under mysterious circumstances.

“During investigations, we found that the woman was last seen with the man inside his Honda-City car on Wednesday afternoon. During search, the car was found inside the victim’s closed garage, with its ignition and AC on,” Superintendent of Police (SP) Capt. M.M. Baig said.

While police found that Ramesh had died due to suffocation, Rita was found in an unconscious state and was rushed at a hospital, where she is reported to have survived.

“Prima facie, the death occurred due to suffocation. We cannot comment on why the two were inside the car and had locked themselves inside the garage. This is a matter of investigation,” Baig said.

“In a confined space like a garage, there is no scope for ventilation. And if the vehicle is switched on, the exhaust emits gases containing carbon monoxide, which get collected in the closed space (garage),” said Dr Sanjeev Lalwani, assistant professor, department of forensic medicine, AIIMS.

“The air conditioning of the car circulates the toxic air in the garage into the car, increasing the levels of carbon monoxide,” he added.

“When a person inhales carbon monoxide, it combines with the haemoglobin in the blood, slowly replacing oxygen. When oxygen is not supplied to the body, it causes respiratory failure,” he said.

According to automobile expert Tutu Dhawan, all cars emit carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxide when the air-conditioner is running.

“In normal circumstances, these gases evaporate in air. In a closed area, these gases act as silent killer. The two gases enter the car through several holes in the car chassis. The persons sitting in the car inhale these gases and slip into a coma and then die,” Dhawan said.