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Children feel Boards are hell

Many schoolkids in the city feel extremely pressured by the enormous expectations of their parents, and are frustrated by the way the Boards are conducted. And they would, if only they could, “abolish” these exams ASAP. Swaha Sahoo finds out.

india Updated: May 23, 2008 01:34 IST
Swaha Sahoo

As Delhi’s Class 12 students prepare for euphoria and brace for heartbreak on Friday morning, here’s something that both their parents and the CBSE should know.

Many schoolkids in the city feel extremely pressured by the enormous expectations of their parents, and are frustrated by the way the Boards are conducted. And they would, if only they could, “abolish” these exams ASAP.

These upset and stressed-out youngsters are venting their feelings on social networking web sites — forums where they can hope to be heard, and find sympathy and understanding from similarly-suffering peers.

A host of anti-CBSE communities on Orkut and Facebook were witnessing hectic activity on the eve of the Class 12 results for Delhi. These communities, with names like CBSE Boards are Hell, I Hate CBSE Boards and CBSE Sucks have, for the past few months, been forums for students to discuss their “shared dislike for exam pressure and stress”.

“When If More Than 10,000 People Join This Group CBSE Will Abolish The Boards began, I joined it,” says Suhail Mathur, of Class XII, Modern, Barakhamba. “It felt good to give support... It was a way to de-stress.”

Jasir Anis from The Indian School says: “The boards are all right, but the pressure from parents and teachers is too much.”

Shruti Tiwari, who is expecting her results on Friday, says: “I blog to get out all the stuff that I can’t otherwise discuss. Writing drains out negative energy, and I get feedback from friends who agree with me. I hope to do well but even if I don’t, I know I have a support group out there... friends who won’t judge me, and with whom I don’t have to compete.”

For George Xavier from St Columba’s, his anti-CBSE Facebook community is “a place where I can vent my anger and frustration”.

It isn’t just youngsters in Delhi either. Students studying under the CBSE in Sharjah and Kuwait are also part of these communities.

Counselors expressed happiness that stressed-out youngsters were talking to each other, and letting out some steam. “Nothing is better than speaking your mind. If students are expressing themselves without fear or hesitation, then they won’t have pent up feelings inside them,” said Vinita Kaul, CBSE counselor. “If they are expressing their displeasure against the system among friends, then a feeling of empathy develops and they feel connected,” she added.