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Chilean miners personify the ‘never say never’ attitude to life

Chilean mines for two months like the 33 miners who were recently rescued, he would have preferred to cut his veins and bleed to death.

india Updated: Nov 06, 2010 21:53 IST

Chilean miners personify the ‘never say never’ attitude to life

Khushwant Singh, in Triumph of human ingenuity (With Malice Towards One and All, October 31), states that if he were stuck in the Chilean mines for two months like the 33 miners who were recently rescued, he would have preferred to cut his veins and bleed to death. Only cowards and no-hopers can think like Singh. We teach our children that one should never give up and endure all challenges till the last breath. At times, even the hope of overcoming an adverse situation gives us enough strength to emerge victorious, as proved by the trapped Chilean miners.

S.C. Vaid, via email

Living in with changing lifestyles

Meenakshi Reddy Madhavan’s article Cohabitation diaries (The Big Story, October 31) on live-in relationships made for interesting reading. Matrimony distinguishes human beings from other life forms. It legitimises the relationship between two individuals who wish to spend their lives together. On the one hand, homosexuality is slowly becoming a way of life and, on the other, the institution of marriage among heterosexuals has begun to lose popularity among the youth.

Bishan Sahai, via email


The goddess of small things

Arundhati Roy, a self-styled social activist, is a publicity-seeker who, having been in the limelight after the success of her only award-winning novel, will do anything to stay in the public eye. Though Vir Sanghvi critiques Roy’s recent comment on Kashmir in his article No damage to India from Roy’s remarks (Counterpoint, October 31), it’s important that both the media and the government stop giving her undue importance. She is nobody and her views will never affect India or its ties with other countries.

Ranjana Manchanda, via email

II

Sanghvi seems to have forgotten that Roy is a seasoned activist and that her comments are not inconsequential. At the same time, it can’t be denied that Roy belongs to that community of Indians who take pride in criticising their motherland.

R.C. Mehta, via email

III

It’s not the first time that Roy has made a seditious remark against India. So why are we making a hullabaloo over her recent comment on Kashmir, which she feels is not a part of India? It seems Roy has lost her sense of judgement. The government should take strong action against her to make Roy and everyone else realise that no one is above the law.

Bhagwan B. Thadani, Mumbai

Learning curve

With reference to Karan Thapar’s article Of girls and boys (Sunday Sentiments, October 31), even in the 21st century, there are many people who are against sending their children, especially girls, to co-ed schools. My school, Maharani Gayatri Devi School, an all-girls school, was the first of its kind in Rajasthan, started by the late Maharani of Jaipur. Initially, people didn’t allow their daughters to attend school. So Gayatri Devi, with G. Lutter, the first principal, went from house to house convincing people to send their wards to school. The school, which began with only 24 students, now teaches over 4,000 girls from different parts of India.

Pallavi Samodia, via email

II

Would someone please ask Thapar to stop going gaga about his alma mater? It’s one thing to be proud of your school and another to promote it by all possible means years after you have left it. If Thapar is so concerned about Doon School’s welfare, he should join its management. The readers of Hindustan Times don’t want to know what he feels is right or wrong for the school.

R.S. Sharma, Surat

Them and US

Manas Chakravarty, in Musings in Mumbai (Loose Canon, October 31), rightly uses satire to highlight how the US ‘uses’ India to its own advantage. But it’s wrong to blame the US alone. New Delhi goes out of its way to appease Washington. We know that the US is arming Pakistan against India, that it is against outsourcing and that it doesn’t want India to become a permanent member of the United Nations Security Council. Even then our subservience to the US is unmatched.

Misha Mrinaya, Durgapur