China fires back at US presidential candidates | india | Hindustan Times
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China fires back at US presidential candidates

China today asked the two US Presidential candidates to tone down their anti-Beijing rhetoric, saying the steady development of relations between the two countries would be good for regional and world peace.

india Updated: Oct 23, 2012 19:44 IST
Sutirtho Patranobis

China on Tuesday asked the two US Presidential candidates to tone down their anti-Beijing rhetoric, saying the steady development of relations between the two countries would be good for regional and world peace.

Beijing’s reaction came after President Barack Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney promised to act tough and firm with China during their final Presidential debate earlier in the day.

“US politicians no matter from what party should view China's development in an objective and rational light and should do more for China-US mutual trust and cooperation,” foreign ministry spokesperson Hong Lei said following the debate.

He added: “The sound and steady development of China-US relations serve the fundamental interests of both countries and both peoples, it is also conducive to regional and world peace, stability and prosperity.”

The state-run Xinhua lost no time in releasing a commentary on the tone adopted on China by Obama and Romney through their debates and campaign.

“The two candidates are still competing to flex their muscles on China. Romney repeated his threat to designate China a currency manipulator and punish it for intellectual property theft, while Obama continued to parade his "trophy" achievements while in office: doubling US exports to China, the most advantageous exchange rates to American business since 1993, and a special task force focusing on trade,” the Tuesday afternoon commentary said.

“They have relentlessly blamed China to cover up their own inabilities to put the domestic economy on track, regardless of the truth. The tactic only serves to reveal that the world's superpower, indeed or temporarily, is running out of ways to sort out the real problems,” it added.

Obama of course pledged cooperation with China amid Washington’s wide trade deficit with China -- which stood at nearly $300 billion in 2011.

"China's an adversary and also a potential partner in the international community if it's following the rules," he said.

China’s response to the few words of comfort was cutting: “A few relieving words, however, are quickly overshadowed by traditional campaign tricks of scapegoating and ill-grounded hypotheses. The US president-in-waiting, no matter who is elected, lacks deep understanding of how partners should treat each other,” the Xinhua commentary said.