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Commentaries on Living

The essential message of J. Krishnamurti challenges the limits of ordinary thought.in these books.

india Updated: Dec 18, 2006 19:16 IST

Commentaries on Living: First Series
Commentaries on Living: Second Series
Commentaries on Living: ThirdSeries

Author: J Krishnamurti
Publisher: Penguin Books India
Price: Rs 250 + Rs 250 + Rs 295
ISBN:
0-14-400151-9 + 0-14-400152-7 + 0-14-400153-5
Format: Paperback 
 
What you are is much more important than what you should be. You can understand what is , but you cannot understand what should be.

The essential message of J. Krishnamurti, revered philosopher and spiritual teacher, challenges the limits of ordinary thought. In talks to audiences worldwide he pointed out to listeners the tangled net of ideas, organizational beliefs and psychological mind-sets in which humanity is caught, and that truth—the understanding of what is—not effort, is the key factor of human liberation.

Commentaries on Living, a three-volume series, records Krishnamurti’s meetings with individual seekers of truth from all walks of life. In these dialogues, he reveals the thought-centred roots of human sorrow and comments on the struggles and issues common to those who strive to break the boundaries of personality and self-limitation. The series invites readers to take a ‘voyage on an unchartered sea’ with Krishnamurti in his exploration of the conditioning of the mind and its freedom.

Here is an excerpt from an essay titled 'Boredom', from Commentaries on Living: Second Series

How necessary it is for the mind to purge itself of all thought, to be constantly empty, not made empty, but simply empty; to die to all thought, to all of yesterday’s memories, and to the coming hour! It is simple to die, and it is hard to continue; for continuity is effort to be or not to be. Effort is desire, and desire can die only when the mind ceases to acquire. How simple it is just to live! But it is not stagnation. There is great happiness in not wanting, in not being something, in not going anywhere. When the mind purges itself of all thought, only then is there the silence of creation. The mind is not tranquil as long as it is traveling in order to arrive. For the mind, to arrive is to succeed, and success is ever the same, whether at the beginning or at the end. There is no purgation of the mind if it is weaving the pattern of its own becoming.


She said she had always been active in one way or another, either with her children, or in social affairs, or in sports; but behind this activity there was always boredom, pressing and constant. She was bored with the routine of life, with pleasure, pain, flattery, and everything else. Boredom was like a cloud that had hung over her life for as long as she could remember. She had tried to escape from it, but every new interest soon became a further boredom, a deadly weariness. She had read a great deal, and had the usual turmoils of family life, but through it all there was this weary boredom. It had nothing to do with her health, for she was very well.

Why do you think you get bored? Is it the outcome of some frustration, of some fundamental desire which has been thwarted?

‘Not especially. There have been some superficial obstructions, but they have never bothered me; or when they have, I have met them fairly intelligently and have never been stumped by them. I don’t think my trouble is frustration, for I have always been able to get what I want. I haven’t cried for the moon, and have been sensible in my demands; but there has nevertheless been this sense of boredom with everything, with my family and with my work.’

What do you mean boredom? Do you mean dissatisfaction? Is it that nothing has given you complete satisfaction?

‘It isn’t quite that. I am as dissatisfied as any normal person but I have been able to reconcile myself to the inevitable dissatisfactions.’

What are you interested in? Is there any deep interest in your life?

‘Not especially. If I had a deep interest I would never be bored. I am naturally an enthusiastic person, I assure you, and if I had an interest I wouldn’t easily let it go. I have had many intermittent interests, but they have all led in the end to this cloud of boredom.

What do you mean by interest? Why is there this change from interest to boredom? What does interest mean? You are interested in that which pleases you, gratifies you, are you not? Is it not interest a process of acquisitiveness? You would not be interested in anything if you did not get something out of it, would you? There is sustained interest as long as you are acquiring; acquisition is interest, is it not? You have contact with; and when you have thoroughly used it, naturally you get bored with it. Every acquisition is a form of boredom, weariness. We want a change of toys; as soon as we lose interest in one, we turn to another, and there is always a new toy to turn to. We turn to something in order to acquire; there is acquisition in pleasure, in knowledge, in fame, in power, in efficiency, in having a family, and so on. When there is nothing further to acquire in one religion, in one saviour, we lose interest and turn to another. Some go to sleep in an organization and never wake up, and those who do wake up put themselves to sleep again by joining another. This acquisitive movement is called expansion of thought, progress.

‘Is interest always acquisition?’

Actually, are you interested in anything which doesn’t give you something, whether it be a play, a game, a conversation, a book, or a person? If a painting doesn’t give you something, you pass it by; if a person doesn’t stimulate or disturb you in some way, if there is no pleasure or pain in a particular relationship, you lost interest, you get bored. Haven’t you noticed this?

‘Yes, but I have never looked at it in this way.’

You wouldn’t have come here if you didn’t want something. You want to be free of boredom. As I cannot give you that freedom, you will get bored again; but if we can together understand the process of acquisition, of interest, of boredom, then perhaps there will be freedom. Freedom cannot be acquired. If you acquire it, you will soon be bored with it. Does not acquisition dull the mind? Acquisition, positive or negative, is a burden. As soon as you acquire, you lose interest. In trying to possess, you are alert, interested; but possession is boredom. You may want to possess more, but the pursuit of more is only a movement towards boredom. You try various forms of acquisition, and as long there is the effort to acquire, there is interest; but there is always an end to acquisition, and so there is always boredom. Isn’t this what has been happening?

‘I suppose it is, but I haven’t grasped the full significance of it.’

That will come presently.

Possessions make the mind weary. Acquisition, whether of knowledge, of property, of virtue, makes for insensitivity. The nature of the mind is to acquire, to absorb, is it not? Or rather, the pattern it has created for itself is one gathering in; and in that very activity the mind is preparing for its own weariness, boredom. Interest, curiosity, is the beginning of acquisition, which soon becomes boredom; and the urge to be free from boredom is another form of possession. So the mind goes from boredom to interest to boredom again, till it is utterly weary; and these successive waves of interest and weariness are regarded as existence.