Committee to look into doing away with medical entrance test | india | Hindustan Times
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Committee to look into doing away with medical entrance test

To make sure students concentrate on their Class 12 exams, the state medical education department wants to scrap the Common Entrance Test (CET). HT Correspondent reports.

india Updated: Jun 20, 2009 00:56 IST
HT Correspondent

To make sure students concentrate on their Class 12 exams, the state medical education department wants to scrap the Common Entrance Test (CET).

A committee has been formed to look into the feasibility of scrapping the CET following which the opinion of the state’s law and judiciary department will be taken.

“Students concentrate only on coaching classes to crack the CET. Students in rural areas may not have similar opportunities. Admissions on the basis of Class 12 scores can bring about leveler,” said W.B. Tayade, director, Directorate of Medical Education and Research (DMER).

“The CBSE and ICSE syllabus is advanced and different from state board which makes them pass easily.”

He said scrapping the CET cannot be done in a hurry and will be announced two years before it goes into effect so that students can make decision.

The state will have to tread carefully since the CET in Maharashtra is in accordance with the Supreme Court (SC) order. “We will have to move an application to the SC and take its permission. If the apex court gives a nod, we will have to pass legislation. It is a long process,” said Tayade.

If CET is scrapped, the government will preserve all its seats for all state students. “Fifteen per cent of undergraduate seats and 50 per cent of post graduate seats are reserved for those outside the state. Scrapping the CET would ensure that all seats stay within the state,” said Tayade.

Till the decision on scrapping CET comes through, the state is mulling a proposal to get the Maharashtra University of Health Sciences (MUHS) — all health science colleges are affiliated to MUHS — to conduct the medical CET.

If that happens, then the Directorate of Technical Education will conduct the CET for engineering courses.

For seven years, the DMER has been conducting the CET for both medical and engineering colleges. “Since the MUHS is the enrolment and examination body, we would like them to conduct the CET. A decision will be taken within two months,” said Tayade.

If the proposal is passed, MUHS will conduct the CET for courses at different levels.

From 2011, medical aspirants will get only three attempts to crack the CET with an upper age limit of 25 years. Now, CET can be given any number of times without any age limit.