Controversial UP maulana to face judgment day on July 23 | india | Hindustan Times
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Controversial UP maulana to face judgment day on July 23

The fate of Maulana Ghulam Mohammad Vastanvi, the controversial vice-chancellor of leading Islamic seminary Darul Uloom, Deoband will be decided at a meeting of the seminary's majlis-e-shoora, or the governing council, on July 23.

india Updated: Jul 03, 2011 23:13 IST
HT Correspondent

The fate of Maulana Ghulam Mohammad Vastanvi, the controversial vice-chancellor of leading Islamic seminary Darul Uloom, Deoband will be decided at a meeting of the seminary's majlis-e-shoora, or the governing council, on July 23.

Vastanvi had triggered a controversy soon after his appointment in January with his alleged remarks praising Gujarat chief minister Narendra Modi.

He had reportedly said Muslims should forget the communal riots of 2002 and move on.

Vastanavi later denied the allegations, saying he was misquoted.

A three-member inquiry committee, which is probing the charges levelled against Vastanvi, will submit its report at the two-day meeting.

"The shoora will discuss the probe report of three-member committee and progress reports of other departments," said Maulana Abul Kasim, acting vice chancellor of the seminary.

The committee members are not unanimous in their views, sources said. Two of the three members support Vastanvi, who is known for his moderate approach and is a staunch supporter of modern education for Muslims.

Vastanvi, who hails from Gujarat, was appointed vice chancellor of the seminary on January 10, after the demise of Maulana Murgoobur Rehman in December 2010.

Following the controversy and protests, the council, at its previous meeting on February 22, appointed Kasim as acting vice chancellor.

The inquiry committee comprising Mufti Mazoor Ahmad from Kanpur, Mufti Mohammad Ismail from Malegaon and Maulana Mohammad Ibrahim from Chennai, was asked to submit its report at the earliest. However, the committee has taken nearly five months to complete the probe.