CPI(M) to turn attention to dalits, adivasis for poll revival | india | Hindustan Times
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CPI(M) to turn attention to dalits, adivasis for poll revival

Once a propagator of classless society as the ultimate goal of Marxism, the CPI(M), in the aftermath of its crushing defeat at the hustings, now wants to reach out to Dalits, backward classes and adivasis in the Hindi heartland.

india Updated: Dec 30, 2015 12:47 IST
Tanmay Chatterjee
CPI(M)

In the draft organisational report, which is being discussed behind closed doors at the Kolkata plenum, CPI(M) general secretary Sitaram Yechury charted out a course of action for reaching out to the Dalit and backward classes.(Subhankar Chakraborty/HT Photo)

Once a propagator of classless society as the ultimate goal of Marxism, the CPI(M), in the aftermath of its crushing defeat at the hustings, now wants to reach out to Dalits, backward classes and adivasis in the Hindi heartland.

In the draft organisational report, which is being discussed behind closed doors at the Kolkata plenum, CPI(M) general secretary Sitaram Yechury charted out a course of action for reaching out to the Dalit and backward classes and has also pointed at failures.

In 2002, the central committee of the CPI(M) selected Bihar, Jharkhand, Maharashtra and Uttar Pradesh as “priority states to concentrate efforts for expansion.” The plenum document admits that in the last 13 years, the party stagnated in Bihar and declined in UP. “Electoral alliances with the major regional parties have adversely affected the independent growth of the party in these two states,” it says without naming the Samajwadi Party or Rashtriya Janata Dal.

The document says the Uttar Pradesh state unit has singularly failed to undertake any campaigns despite repeated decisions. “In Bihar and Madhya Pradesh some issues of social oppression have been taken up sporadically,” it adds.

Yechury said his party would make strong efforts to increase its presence in the Hindi belt. “Class struggle in India stands on two feet; economic exploitation and social oppression. We have to win the confidence of people facing social oppression,” he said.

“The party has to organise schools for cadres in Hindi-speaking states... There should be a central mechanism for publication and distribution of party literature and campaign material in Hindi. Meetings of secretaries of Hindi states should be held twice a year to monitor the work…” the plenum document says.