Criticism doesn’t affect me, says Mandira | india | Hindustan Times
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Criticism doesn’t affect me, says Mandira

In a chat with Atreyo Mukhopadhyay, Mandira Bedi says I have realised that I must be thick-skinned and not let criticism get to me. It’s a question of hanging in there. Looking back, it feels great that despite the adverse reactions, I have made it.

india Updated: Apr 22, 2009 00:23 IST
Atreyo Mukhopadhyay

Her association with cricket evoked mixed reactions. But since starting off as a presenter for the 2003 World Cup, Mandira Bedi has become a familiar face on Indian television. Even now, the reactions are mixed, but there is no denying that she has fought hard to be where she is.

IPL-2 is seeing her in a new role. Earlier, her activities were restricted to the studios. Now, she is on the spot, interviewing players on and off the field and reporting from the stands.

Talking to HT, Mandira said the last few years had taught her to fight it out. “I have realised that I must be thick-skinned and not let criticism get to me. It’s a question of hanging in there long enough. If I do it well, I will make it. Looking back, it feels great that despite the adverse reactions early on, I have made it.”

Mandira said she tried too hard during her early days on the job. “I used to read everything I could lay my hands on…also tried talking to people. Now, I have realised that it’s not rocket science. To do my job and raise points, I just have to be comfortable with the game. If I love the game, it will come across.”

The lady is happy with the response she gets these days. “Today, when something happens in the world of cricket, I get calls from newspaper journalists and TV channels. Being someone who never thought of herself as anything more than a wild cricket enthusiast, this is a huge feeling.”

Coming out of the studio and being in the thick of things has left her excited. “Earlier, I used to watch the proceedings on the 14-inch monitor. To be at the ground, sitting by the boundary line and actually watch the ball cross the line is a huge feeling.”

“Pretty much an Indian cricket fan,” Mandira said, “I do follow what the other teams are doing, but I don’t watch them very often and read about the games in newspapers.”

It doesn’t matter, for those who love watching Mandira aren’t complaining.