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Culture curry: Easter recipes from all across India

We reached out to members of five different communities - east Indians, Goans, Malayalis, north-east Indians and Puducherry Christians - and got each of them share a Easter recipe that is unique to their culture.

india Updated: Apr 04, 2015 16:32 IST
Susan Jose

On Easter, food becomes the highlight of the celebrations after 40 days of fasting. While usually the day is associated with colourful Easter eggs, there are several communities that prepare a special spread with different preparations altogether. Here, we reached out to members of five different communities - east Indians, Goans, Malayalis, north-east Indians and Puducherry Christians - and got each of them share a recipe that is unique to their culture.

* Malayalis
From home-made wines to rice cakes, the Kerala Christian community prepares a wide array of culinary delights on Easter.

Celine Figarado, a homemaker, says, "I prefer soaking the grapes just 10 days before Easter with the right amount of sugar. Some people start the process a few months ahead. Some even add wheat to the solution."

The other popular Easter delicacy in Kerala is Appam With Stew, and making it can really test your patience.
"Make sure you extract coconut milk twice. The first extraction is thicker, so set it aside and use the second one that is watery in consistency to boil the vegetables," she says.

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* Puducherry Christians
While many visit Puducherry to see the architecture, if you are in the city for Easter, take time out to try the authentic cuisine prepared by Puducherry Christians.

"Those days I remember as kids we would run to shops to buy Easter eggs, which were hard like stones, because they were made of just sugar. I also remember feasting on Turkey Kurma at my Uncle's place," says 72-year-old Elisabeth Faciolle.

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* North-east Indians
Over the years their food traditions have remained untouched.
"We really like our chilli-based food items," says Chequevera Sangma, a Meghalaya native.

Moakala Longchar, a Naga food-blogger, says, "In my hometown we prepare Anishi and Pork With Bamboo Shoot for Easter. For dessert, we eat fresh fruits."

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* East Indians
This community predominantly comprises Roman Catholics, and has a very distinct cuisine. "For Lent, we abstain from meat. On Easter, we feast on east-Indian delicacies such as Fugias and Duck Moile," says Jude D'Mello, an east-Indian, who grew up in Orlem.

"Easter eggs, buns and vindaloo are some of the dishes that every east-Indian household prepares for Easter," says Giselle Creado, who runs a small-scale food service.

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* Goans
Christianity in Goa has Portuguese roots and the Goan cuisine borrows a lot from the European kitchens such as using alcohol to soften meat. "Apart from the usual Easter bread and eggs, we make goan delicacies like Whole Roast Pigling, Chicken Cafreal Roast, Sorpotel, Mutton Xacuti and Prawn Balchao," says Lillian Heppolette, a Goan, who lives in Vasai.

"On returning home from mass, I always look forward to having the Sannas that is made with coconut," says Felix Suarez, a young entrepreneur.

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