Dad, honking isn’t cool | india | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Oct 20, 2017-Friday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Dad, honking isn’t cool

When their children make a pertinent point, parents perk up their ears. The traffic police are counting on just that to drive home good road tips to citizens — and have roped in school children as traffic ambassadors.

india Updated: Feb 14, 2009 14:42 IST
Megha Sood

When their children make a pertinent point, parents perk up their ears. The traffic police are counting on just that to drive home good road tips to citizens — and have roped in school children as traffic ambassadors.

On Friday, about 100 children from 20 city schools came together as part of the ‘children’s movement for civic awareness’ to learn about the adverse effects of drink driving and unnecessary honking.

Deputy Commissioner of Police (traffic) Harish Baijal said cases of drink driving were down by 40 per cent in a year but there was a need to bring them further down.

“People have a negative image of the police. If we try to explain to them (good driving tips) they will never respond positively, but if their children act as responsible citizens and tell their parents not to break traffic laws they will definitely listen,” said Assistant Commissioner of traffic police (planning) Amarjeet Singh, who used slide shows to explain to the children what it meant to be a traffic policeman and asked them to pass on the safety mantra to their parents and classmates.

Traffic constables used power point presentations, picture stories, demonstrations and models to instruct the children, who responded enthusiastically.

Sunita Yadav (14), a Class 9 student of Little Flower of Jesus High School, Kalbadevi, said she was happy being a “cub policeman” of the traffic police. “My plan is to spread the message of ‘no-honking’ and the importance of wearing seat belts and helmets while driving,” she said. “I will see to it that nobody in my community breaks traffic rules.”

Mayuresh Ambekar (13), a Class 8 student from Navy Children School, Colaba, declared his dream was to become a traffic policeman. “I really hate it when I get stuck for hours with my family in traffic.”

Singh said it was embarrassing for parents to be told by their children what they already know. “If a child educated here today sees his parents talking on the mobile phone or unnecessarily honking while driving, he will immediately remind them that this is against the law and that they could be fined,” he said.