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Death is inevitable

But why hasten it by taking those calls on mobile phones from your boss and other ill-wishers?

india Updated: Jun 05, 2011 23:21 IST

Is there a correlation between putting your body in danger and caring about keeping it shipshape? To put it a bit more plainly: is it true that the more we obsess about our physical well-being the higher the chances of us finding it under attack and disrepair?

The World Health Organisation (WHO), the truly maternal global body that worries about how unhealthy we are, has reiterated in a new study that mobile phones may cause brain cancer. By actually naming the type of brain cancer a heavy mobile phone user is liable to end up suffering from — glioma — panic has been upped a notch or two.

But the WHO hasn’t singled out the cellphone in the possible carcinogenic category.

Any device that emits radio frequency electromagnetic waves such as radars, microwaves, radio and television signals — and some say the brain of former president APJ Abdul Kalam — are in the cancer-risk category.

But folks who smoke, work in nuclear facilities and drink ordinary water rebottled cunningly into ‘mineral water’ bottles shouldn’t worry, as they already are at a higher risk category — ‘carcinogenic to humans’.

So for them, with damage and death a happy surety, more talk time on the cellphone will be a sort of double indemnity.

On the flip side of things, you can now always refrain from picking up calls from your boss, spouse or the stranger you may have spent the night with, and blame it on your worries about your health. Thanks to the WHO, they should now understand.

As for the yet-to-be published WHO report about being alive causing ultimate death, watch this space.