Death of the photo album | india | Hindustan Times
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Death of the photo album

World photography day, which was on Wednesday, probably saw a lot of people taking pictures. But with the digital world offering a multitude of ways to preserve happy memories, the family photo album might well be on its last legs, reports Lina Choudhury-Mahajan.

india Updated: Aug 22, 2009 01:25 IST
Lina Choudhury-Mahajan

World photography day, which was on Wednesday, probably saw a lot of people taking pictures. But with the digital world offering a multitude of ways to preserve happy memories, the family photo album might well be on its last legs.

Especially in a world when every incident is a Facebook moment and worthy of updating your ‘FB status’.

Most people of the FB generation thrive on uploading pictures by recording every exciting moment of their lives.
Parveen Chogga lives by this mantra. “I take my digicam whenever I go out with friends and family and take at least 30 to 40 pictures at a time and upload them on Facebook,” says Chogga.

Photo fans can now upload albums on photo display sites like Zoomin.com, Picasa or Flickr. About 10 lakh photos are uploaded in Zoomin every month. “Zoomin.com. enables customers to upload unlimited photos and share them for free. By creating the service, we have also created a platform for everyone to be ‘memory keepers’ of the family,” says Sunny Balijepalli, founder and CEO, Zoomin.com.

Photo-viewing sites have taken the neighbourhood “photo studio” to the next level of convenience. But this is not great news for some.

“Our business has suffered in a way because of digital technology. Few people maintain albums of photos in their homes now,” says Vijay Bhanushali, who owns Foto Ankur, a photo studio in Ghatkopar.

So where does that leave the good old photo album? “Working with film is a tedious process. Digital is easier, cost-effective and less time consuming,” says 33-year-old Sharma, who uses a Canon 5D 12-mega-pixel camera for his work.
Alok Bharadwaj, senior vice president, Canon India says that this year, they expect India to have 12 lakh market size for digital still cameras and over 20,000 for digital SLR’s.

And it doesn’t hurt that photo-storing websites also offer the user a variety of tools. “Firms such as Google are also offering more complex tools for managing personal photo libraries. Many companies offer website storage which manages photo collections, lets users edit pictures online etc,” said Bharadwaj.