Delay upsets students | india | Hindustan Times
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Delay upsets students

Students and principals in the city rued the further delay to junior college admissions after the state government on Thursday announced its decision to challenge the Bombay High Court verdict scrapping the Best-Five policy.

india Updated: Jun 25, 2010 01:35 IST
HT Correspondent

Students and principals in the city rued the further delay to junior college admissions after the state government on Thursday announced its decision to challenge the Bombay High Court verdict scrapping the Best-Five policy.

“First we were waiting for our SSC results, then for the first hearing and then for the final verdict. Now again we will have to wait for the Supreme Court verdict,” said Harsh Aladia, a St Xavier’s Boys’ Academy student. “I’m getting frustrated just sitting around at home.”

“Students and parents are tense about what will happen now,” said Padmini Hariani, a parent whose son studies at Hiranandani Foundation School in Powai. “One more month will pass, when will the colleges reopen? How will they complete the syllabus?”

College principals echoed the same worry that a delay would mean trouble ahead for the academic year. “I don’t know how we will complete the session, I’m very apprehensive,” said Dr Kirti Narain, principal of Jai Hind College at Churchgate. “Last year the session began on August 10 and we had to cancel some unit tests.”

This is the third consecutive year that a government policy for admissions to junior college has been rejected by the high court after petitions filed by ICSE parents.

Last year, the court scrapped the 90:10 policy and in 2008, the percentile scheme.

The government’s decision to challenge the court’s verdict has opened up a small beacon of hope for SSC students, however. “This offers some hope for students and their parents. They have their fingers crossed,” said Rohit Bhat, principal of Children’s Academy at Malad.

“The students were dejected because they had already begun to celebrate their good marks, but then they found that they had rejoiced too soon,” he added.