Delhi police come sniffing ?KGMC?! | india | Hindustan Times
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Delhi police come sniffing ?KGMC?!

A RACKET involving fake admission forms came to light at the King George?s Medical University. Forms worth Rs 6,20,000, for admission to KGMU through ?paid seats?, were being printed and sold in the market. But, the fact is that the varsity has no seats under the ?paid? or ?management? quota! The forms invited drafts in the name of both officials through forms sold in the name of ?KGMC?, at several locations in Lucknow.

india Updated: Sep 14, 2006 00:13 IST

A RACKET involving fake admission forms came to light at the King George’s Medical University. Forms worth Rs 6,20,000, for admission to KGMU through ‘paid seats’, were being printed and sold in the market. But, the fact is that the varsity has no seats under the ‘paid’ or ‘management’ quota! The forms invited drafts in the name of both officials through forms sold in the name of ‘KGMC’, at several locations in Lucknow.

Delhi police visited the campus on Wednesday in connection with an FIR lodged at Morrisnagar police station by one of the aspirants in July. Interestingly, the forms were sold in 2004 but the FIR was lodged two years later. Those running the racket first opened a joint account in the name of director admission J Dutta and finance officer SD Maurya at the State Bank of India’s (SBI’s) Nagar Nigam branch and then got the forms printed.

Confirming the visit by Delhi cops, finance officer of the KGMU A Gani said, “Delhi cops were here for an enquiry. But we do not have much information since the matter is two years old and the operation was running outside the campus.”

At least, Rs 6,20,000 were collected and withdrawn from the account, leaving all applicants in a limbo. The fact that there are no paid seats in KGMU and also that the name is KGMU and not KGMC was not observed by the applicants.

When Delhi cops came to the KGMU, they were told by officials here that information of such an account reached the campus only in 2004.