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Delimitation panel in City on Feb 22

DELIMITATION COMMISSION of India led by Chairman Justice Kuldip Singh is visiting Indore on February 22 to hold a public hearing on the Commission?s draft proposals for changing the boundaries of Assembly and parliamentary constituencies of Indore and Ujjain division. There are 36 Assembly segments in Indore division and 29 in Ujjain division.

india Updated: Feb 19, 2007 00:17 IST

DELIMITATION COMMISSION of India led by Chairman Justice Kuldip Singh is visiting Indore on February 22 to hold a public hearing on the Commission’s draft proposals for changing the boundaries of Assembly and parliamentary constituencies of Indore and Ujjain division. There are 36 Assembly segments in Indore division and 29 in Ujjain division.

The public hearing at Anand Mohan Mathur auditorium will start with receiving objections from the residents of Ujjain division.

The post-lunch session has been reserved for Indore division but the hearing could extend a day further depending upon the number of objections received.

“The decision to extend the hearing will depend on number of people who come to place their objections or recommendations,” State Chief Electoral Officer J S Mathur said over phone from Bhopal.

“Our job is only to provide platform to the Commission to hold the public hearing,” Mathur added when asked about the preparations being made by his office for the public hearing in Madhya Pradesh.

The exercise is to re-adjust territorial constituencies of Lok Sabha and the State legislative assemblies on the basis of the 2001census figures in the country.

This will be done without changing the total number of Lok Sabha seats and the number of Assembly constituencies in each State.

Under Article 82 of the Constitution, the Parliament enacts a Delimitation Act after every census. Once the Act comes into enforcement, the Union Government constitutes a Delimitation Commission, which demarcates the boundaries of the constituencies.

The present delimitation of constituencies is based on 1971 census figures. However, the Constitution was amended in 1976, which said there could be no delimitation of constituencies till the first census after 2000. Thus, the existing constituencies carved out on the basis of 1971 census are still continuing.

The 2001 census data was released in 2003. As a result, a new delimitation exercise is under way using these figures. For delimitation, the State’s total population (2001 census) will be divided by total number of Assembly constituencies to obtain the State average per Assembly constituency.

Based on this average, constituencies are to be delimited in a manner that each constituency has an equal population though a deviation of 10 per cent has been allowed without affecting the geographical features, means of communication, public convenience and administrative units. (This includes district, sub-divisions, tehsils, patwari circles, panchayat samitis, panchayats etc)

“This means that if a patwari circle (consisting of few villages) is adopted as the lowest administrative unit, then while delimiting an Assembly constituency, the entire patwari circle will be included in that Assembly segment and the villages contained in it will not be divided into different Assembly constituencies,” Indore district election observer Suresh Yadav said.

According to Indore district election office, areas divided by rivers, hilly ranges, forests, ravines and other natural barriers will not be put in the same constituency.  The extent of constituencies to be delimited now will remain frozen till the first census to be taken after 2026.