Doctor?s negligence costs man his leg | india | Hindustan Times
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Doctor?s negligence costs man his leg

MAKING A mockery of tall claims of the State Government about health services improving in the villages, treatment by a village doctor cost a man dear after gangrene affected his whole leg.

india Updated: Aug 10, 2006 23:07 IST

MAKING A mockery of tall claims of the State Government about health services improving in the villages, treatment by a village doctor cost a man dear after gangrene affected his whole leg.

The patient, Champa Lal (45), was yesterday admitted to Maharaja Yeshwant Rao Hospital (MYH) in a serious condition after being turned down by several government and private hospitals.

A resident of village Roshni, Harsud, Champa Lal had been running high temperature and was diagnosed to be afflicted by malaria recently. He was shown to a private doctor known to villagers as Malviya who used to visit their village regularly.

Unaware of his qualifications and unsure as to his methodology of treatment, the family put a blind faith in the man in the white coat, took the patient to him. The doctor gave injection to bring down the temperature.

However, Champa Lal complained of pain in the hip where he was given the injection and on the second day the spot had turned black. By the third day blood had started oozing out from the spot and the entire area up to thigh had turned black with the skin becoming rough.

The patient was taken on Tuesday to the block level hospital from where he was referred to the tehsil level hospital. The patient was refused treatment on Wednesday in the private JJ Hospital in Khandwa and was referred to the district hospital Khandwa and from there in turn to MYH.

Champa Lal was immediately admitted in the surgical ICU and was moved only after his condition stabilised to ward 12 on the third floor.   

Doctors maintain that it is too early to pinpoint the exact reason of the malady to doctoral neglect or reaction of the injection. The vaccine in question has to be inoculated deep in the muscle and a superficial prick leads to spilling of the dose in unwanted places leading to skin abrasion.

In medical terms the condition is called injection abscess and gangrene of the skin casing sub-cuticular infection of the skin and whole cellulites of the limb. The condition is aggravated in diabetic patients whose immune system is already weak.

Patient’s nephews Phulchand of village Roshni and Laxman Kasade of Dhar blame the doctor for this condition of their uncle. They point out that earlier he was suffering only from fever but the situation worsened after treatment at the hands of the village doctor.

Such allegations pour buckets of water over government’s scheme to take the services of those doctors (from any specialisation) willingly going into rural and backward areas on the pattern of barefoot doctors and underline the importance of screening of such doctors for valid degrees.