Entrance to nursery less testing now | india | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Dec 10, 2016-Saturday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Entrance to nursery less testing now

india Updated: Oct 18, 2006 17:52 IST
Highlight Story

Finally some relief for the thousands of parents preparing to get their children admitted to nursery schools in Delhi.

On Tuesday, the Delhi High Court accepted the recommendations of the Ashok Ganguly Committee, which proposes doing away with all kinds of tests and interviews of children and their parents by the school to which admission is sought.

The report also recommends that schools give preference to applicants who live in the neighbourhood, to siblings of students already enrolled, to the children of alumni, and girl children.

A bench comprising Acting Chief Justice Vijender Jain and Justice Kailash Gambhir directed that the measures suggested by the committee be used on a tri- al basis for a year starting from December.

The court asked the committee to come up with more suggestions at the next hearing on November 3.

Click to enlarge

From December 1, schools will have to follow a common admission calendar. The Ganguly panel has proposed an admission procedure using a total of 100 points where weightage is given to different factors.

Five points are earmarked for girl children, and children with special needs who may benefit from mainstreaming.

Twenty marks have been set aside for any particular parameter a school may want to fix. But these will have to be made known publicly.

A maximum of 20 points have been allotted to children in the neighbourhood.

The weightage decreases proportionately — from 20 points to those who live within a radius of 3 km of the school to eight points for those live within 10 km, beyond which no points are given.
There is, however, no ban on seeking admission in a school far from home. "The committee felt such a ban would be misplaced since there is a paucity of good schools in many localities," said Puneet Mittal, advocate for the Ganguly committee. "But schools should admit children from the neighbourhood first."

While welcoming the decision to have a common admission procedure across the board, school authorities said some interaction with parents, before admitting their children, was desirable.

"It is good to meet the parents when their child is set to spend 13 years with you," said Usha Ram, chairperson, National Progressive Schools Conference, and principal, Laxman Public School. The committee has also allotted 20 points to the parents' level of education.

Ganguly said the committee's recommendations were based on field tests. "We are talking about private unaided schools and the parents of most applicants to these are educated," he said. "We wanted to send a clear message that parents play a very crucial role in a child's education. But if a school's authorities feel most parents in the neighbourhood are largely not highly educated, they can compensate for the same from the 20 points allocated to them."

Schools have been asked to wind up the admission process latest by March 15. They will have to display a list of candidates along with their cut-off points and the names of those in the shortlist and waiting list.

The weightage decreases proportionately — from 20 points to those who live within a radius of three kilometre of the school to eight points for those live within 10 km, beyond which no points are given.

There is, however, no ban on seeking admission in a school far from home. "The committee felt such a ban would be misplaced since there is a paucity of good schools in many localities," said Puneet Mittal, advocate for the Ganguly committee.

"But schools should admit children from the neighbourhood first." While welcoming the decision to have a common admission procedure across the board, school authorities said some interaction with parents, before admitting their children, was desirable.

"It is good to meet the parents when their child is set to spend 13 years with you," said Usha Ram, chairperson, National Progressive Schools Conference, and principal, Laxman Public School.

The committee has also allotted 20 points to the parents' level of education. Ganguly said the committee's recommendations were based on field tests.

"We are talking about private unaided schools and the parents of most applicants to these are educated," he said. "We wanted to send a clear message that parents play a very crucial role in a child's education. But if a school's authorities feel most parents in the neighbourhood are largely not highly educated, they can compensate for the same from the 20 points allocated to them."

Schools have been asked to wind up the admission process latest by March 15. They will have to display a list of candidates along with their cut-off points and the names of those in the shortlist and waiting list.

tags