Everything you want to know about the LeT | india | Hindustan Times
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Everything you want to know about the LeT

Lashkar e Tayyeba, which means “army of the pure”, has been active since 1993. It ran as the military wing of the Pakistani Islamist organisation, Markaz-ad-Dawa-wal-Irshad, which was founded in 1989 and recruited volunteers to fight alongside the Taliban.

india Updated: Feb 20, 2010 22:22 IST

Lashkar e Tayyeba, which means “army of the pure”, has been active since 1993. It ran as the military wing of the Pakistani Islamist organisation, Markaz-ad-Dawa-wal-Irshad, which was founded in 1989 and recruited volunteers to fight alongside the Taliban.

During the 1990s, the LeT is said to have received funding from Pakistan’s intelligence agency, the Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI), in exchange for a pledge to target Hindus in Jammu and Kashmir and to train Muslim extremists on Indian soil.

The LeT has its headquarters in Muridke near Lahore in Pakistan, and is headed by Hafiz Muhammad Saeed, a former Islamic-studies professor. It publishes its views and opinion through its website, an Urdu-language monthly journal, Al-Dawa, and an Urdu weekly, Gazwa. It also publishes several other magazines, including Voice of Islam, an English-language monthly.

Experts say LeT received funding from the ISI and Saudi Arabia. LeT also coordinates its charitable activities through its front organisation Jamaat-ud-Dawah (JUD), which spearheaded humanitarian relief to the victims of the 2005 earthquake in Kashmir.

A group called Lashkar-e-Qahar in 2006 said it was associated with LeT and orchestrated the Mumbai bombings. New Delhi also accused the Student Islamic Movement of India of connections with LeT and the Mumbai blasts as well as terrorist attacks in August 2003.

Indian security officials have said that one of the captured attackers, Ajmal Kasab, revealed under questioning that he belonged to the LeT, and had been trained in militant camps inside Pakistan. Lashkar e Tayyeba, which means “army of the pure”, has been active since 1993. It ran as the military wing of the Pakistani Islamist organisation, Markaz-ad-Dawa-wal-Irshad, which was founded in 1989 and recruited volunteers to fight alongside the Taliban.

During the 1990s, the LeT is said to have received funding from Pakistan’s intelligence agency, the Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI), in exchange for a pledge to target Hindus in Jammu and Kashmir and to train Muslim extremists on Indian soil.

The LeT has its headquarters in Muridke near Lahore in Pakistan, and is headed by Hafiz Muhammad Saeed, a former Islamic-studies professor. It publishes its views and opinion through its website, an Urdu-language monthly journal, Al-Dawa, and an Urdu weekly, Gazwa. It also publishes several other magazines, including Voice of Islam, an English-language monthly.

Experts say LeT received funding from the ISI and Saudi Arabia. LeT also coordinates its charitable activities through its front organisation Jamaat-ud-Dawah (JUD), which spearheaded humanitarian relief to the victims of the 2005 earthquake in Kashmir.

A group called Lashkar-e-Qahar in 2006 said it was associated with LeT and orchestrated the Mumbai bombings. New Delhi also accused the Student Islamic Movement of India of connections with LeT and the Mumbai blasts as well as terrorist attacks in August 2003.

Indian security officials have said that one of the captured attackers, Ajmal Kasab, revealed under questioning that he belonged to the LeT, and had been trained in militant camps inside Pakistan.