?Farming in India began much earlier? | india | Hindustan Times
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?Farming in India began much earlier?

FARMING IN India started much before than is generally believed. Experts in the fields of archaeology and history said this while shedding light on earliest history of India, Indian culture and other aspects at the annual joint conference of the Indian Archaeological Society, Indian Society for Prehistoric and Quaternary Studies and the Indian History and Culture Society, which was organised here at Jiwaji University on Sunday.

india Updated: Dec 04, 2006 17:25 IST

FARMING IN India started much before than is generally believed. Experts in the fields of archaeology and history said this while shedding light on earliest history of India, Indian culture and other aspects at the annual joint conference of the Indian Archaeological Society, Indian Society for Prehistoric and Quaternary Studies and the Indian History and Culture Society, which was organised here at Jiwaji University on Sunday.

Professor VD Mishra said that new researches have revealed that agricultural practices in India started in Mesolithic period (6-7,000 BC), much before the Neolithic period (4000 BC) as is generally believed.

This discovery has proved that agriculture in India started simultaneously with other parts of the world. He said that Sativa rice, discovered from excavations at Chopni in Belan valley, has proved that India did not lag behind in agriculture.

Former director of Indian Archaeological society JP Joshi said that archaeologists have contributed a lot in re-constructing India’s past. He said that archeologists are using latest technologies, including satellite technology, and Indian archaeology is in an advanced state.  He emphasised the importance of preserving archaeological and historical heritage.

Joshi said that encroachments around historical monuments should be stopped because it harms our heritage. Citing an example, he said that Gwalior Fort could not be declared World Heritage due to encroachments. Other scholars shed light on history and archaeology of central India. It was argued that agricultural robustness was visible in the period between Indus Valley Civilization and Iron Age.