Fashion street gets a new lick! | india | Hindustan Times
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Fashion street gets a new lick!

The tongue and lip design, associated with Roling Stones is now fasttracking it?s way back into street fashion, writes Kabeer Sharma.

india Updated: Dec 27, 2006 17:28 IST

A mouth half-opened in ecstasy, blood red lips and a tongue that’s become one of the most widely recognisable symbols of the rock and roll movement since the 1960s – the Mick Jagger lick is back where it belongs – on our chests.

The symbol of one of the greatest rock bands in the world – the tongue and lip design is now fasttracking it’s way back into street fashion.

And, the trend, rather unsurprisingly is once again driven by Bollywood though, we’re not really sure how Mick Jagger would react if he saw the rhinestone-studded versions of the tshirt that seem to have caught the fancy of Abhishek Bachchan and Kareena Kapoor!

Abhishek wore his red rhinestone studded T-shirt in the promos of Dhoom 2 (dictated by stylist Anaita Schroff of course!).

The movie despite getting the chotta B plenty of flack for his wardrobe (“he looks best in long sleeved T-shirts and not sleeves that end above the elbow,” a fashion designer was heard saying at a launch recently) also marks the return of the trend.                                                                                           

Kareena Kapoor sports a tongue and lip design

 Something that was further fired up when Kareena Kapoor made a colour coordinated appearance with Shahid Kapur when she showed off a ‘sequinned studded’ longsleeved tee complete with dates – October 1678 at Manish Malhotra’s store launch last week.

Others washing their hands in the trend include designer Azeem Khan – who showed off his Rolling Stones and flower cluttered white shirt at the launch of a new lounge bar in the city.

The Rolling Stones’ “Tongue and Lip Design” logo was believed by many to have been designed by Andy Warhol when it actually was designed by John Pasche.

The confusion probably stemmed out of him designing cover art for The Rolling Stones albums Sticky Fingers (1971) and Love You Live (1977) besides doing portraits of Mick Jagger.

It’s also catching up on Linking road - the street that decides whether what the friendly neibghourhood designer prescribed will make it into your and my cupboards.

E-mail author: kabeer.sharma@hindustantimes.com